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Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 7th 07, 06:01 PM posted to misc.kids
Jeff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,321
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

enigma wrote:
Jeff wrote in
news:[email protected]:


It is also unkind to spam. That is what the OP is doing. He
doesn't care about popular names. He cares about getting
money.


unless he's the owner of pollspace, which i sincerely doubt,
he's not getting any money for people looking at or clicking
on his poll. therefore, it is not spamming.


The site has advertising from Google. So he may be getting royalties
from that or a cut that the site gets. Plus, he is essentially
advertising for the site.

I have seen his spam on other newsgroups.

i don't like spam any more than you do (& probably less,
since i was a sys admin at an ISP), but you really need to get
a grip sometimes Jeff why don't you get a real newsreader,
with real filters, & save yourself some aggrivation?
lee


I worked for an ISP, too (I was a release engineer). The spam cut into
the company's profits, because they need a few engineers to deal with
the problem, more servers to handle the load, etc. That indirectly
lowered the value of my options because the company had lower profits to
report.

As already pointed out, newsreaders only filter out things after you've
seen similar things.

But the way, I am not very aggravated at the spammers. They're mostly
trying to make a living. But not at my expense.

Jeff
  #12  
Old June 7th 07, 06:15 PM posted to misc.kids
Banty
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Posts: 2,278
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

In article , toypup says...

On 7 Jun 2007 07:53:36 -0700, Banty wrote:

In article , toypup says...

On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 11:01:57 +0000 (UTC), enigma wrote:

JohnZhang wrote in
ups.com:

What do you think among these 3 choices? thanks for any
input!

http://www.thepollspace.com/polls.ph...=75&category=0

did you mean to use Nicolas, Steven (Stephen) or Robert? i
certainly hope so, because actually naming the poor child with
a diminuative is unkind. it's hard enough to get along in the
adult world without being saddled with a 'baby nickname' as
your given name.

Maybe the guy doesn't know English and those names sound fine in his
language?


And if we proposed Sasha or Dima for a boy child, and a Russian speaker object
that those are diminuitives for real names, would you accept as a defense "oh
well, we don't know Russian and those names sound fine in our language"?

It's a perfectly valid objection.

Banty


Yes, in their own country. In our country, the child would not feel
saddled with a diminuitive, because the majority of the people would not
know it is a diminuitive.

SIL has a foreign name which sounds fine here. When she went to the
country from which it origniates, the natives were puzzled, because it
would not be something anyone there would want to name their own child.
IL's found it amusing, because they were trying to give her a name related
to her roots. SIL has never felt saddled with that name, neither as an
adult nor as a child.


But it's a smaller and smaller world. I don't think it's a good idea to plead
ignorance, even ignorance of most folks in one's locale, in using a name from a
different culture. Even one's own ancestral culture.

Although the case you mention sounds more like maybe it was a matter of using a
rather old-fasioned or outmoded name or version of it... ?? If not, (or even if
so) see, something was lost in her being able to connect to her country of
ancestral origin because of this. Knowledge is a good thing, y'know.

Banty

  #13  
Old June 7th 07, 07:03 PM posted to misc.kids
toypup
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Posts: 1,227
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

On 7 Jun 2007 10:15:57 -0700, Banty wrote:

In article , toypup says...


SIL has a foreign name which sounds fine here. When she went to the
country from which it origniates, the natives were puzzled, because it
would not be something anyone there would want to name their own child.
IL's found it amusing, because they were trying to give her a name related
to her roots. SIL has never felt saddled with that name, neither as an
adult nor as a child.


But it's a smaller and smaller world. I don't think it's a good idea to plead
ignorance, even ignorance of most folks in one's locale, in using a name from a
different culture. Even one's own ancestral culture.


Well, sometimes people know how it's supposed to be done in another locale
but just don't care? Heck, they don't care when it's not done in their own
locale. Just look at all those unique apellings. Eventually, it becomes
more acceptable.


Although the case you mention sounds more like maybe it was a matter of using a
rather old-fasioned or outmoded name or version of it... ?? If not, (or even if
so) see, something was lost in her being able to connect to her country of
ancestral origin because of this. Knowledge is a good thing, y'know.

Banty


I think it was a name for a river or something and people there didn't name
themselves after rivers. Actually, the name is very common here in
America. You wouldn't think it's a foreign name. It just was strange in
the country from which everyone "knows" it originates.

So, Joe may one day become a commmon name in China and no one there will a
rat's *ss there that it's not done that way here. And I don't think we'd
care much if somemone from there came over here calling himself Joe,
either. Do you?
  #14  
Old June 8th 07, 02:42 AM posted to misc.kids
[email protected]
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Posts: 105
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

Lee wrote:
did you mean to use Nicolas, Steven (Stephen) or Robert? i
certainly hope so, because actually naming the poor child with
a diminuative is unkind. it's hard enough to get along in the
adult world without being saddled with a 'baby nickname' as
your given name.


Mary laughs: WAAAAAAY true. In high school, my boyfriend sent a way to
get a copy of his birth certificate - and was flat out horrified his
parents had actually registered his name as "Ricky" instead of
Richard.
Probably seemed cute when he was a rolly polly bundle of joy, but not
so cute when he was grown up.

  #16  
Old June 8th 07, 11:35 AM posted to misc.kids
enigma
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Posts: 447
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

wrote in
oups.com:

Lee wrote:
did you mean to use Nicolas, Steven (Stephen) or Robert? i
certainly hope so, because actually naming the poor child
with a diminuative is unkind. it's hard enough to get
along in the adult world without being saddled with a
'baby nickname' as your given name.


Mary laughs: WAAAAAAY true. In high school, my boyfriend
sent a way to get a copy of his birth certificate - and was
flat out horrified his parents had actually registered his
name as "Ricky" instead of Richard.
Probably seemed cute when he was a rolly polly bundle of
joy, but not so cute when he was grown up.


girls get it worse though. i know grown women who suffer
through being named Ducky, Precious, Bambi, Sugar, Muffy. yes,
seriously, those *are* their given names.
that sort of name is maybe cute until the child is 4. then
it's a huge liability to the child.
and while an adult *can* legally choose to change their name
many don't want to offend their parents by doing so. or (in my
case anyway) the parents think the given name is perfectly
good & refuse to use the changed name. i just dropped my first
name, which i loathe, & use my middle name, which is nice,
short & androgynous since neither of my parents use *their*
first names, i claim to be standing on family tradition
lee

  #18  
Old June 8th 07, 02:20 PM posted to misc.kids
cjra
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Posts: 1,015
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

On Jun 7, 11:26 am, toypup wrote:
On 7 Jun 2007 07:53:36 -0700, Banty wrote:



In article , toypup says...


On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 11:01:57 +0000 (UTC), enigma wrote:


JohnZhang wrote in
groups.com:


What do you think among these 3 choices? thanks for any
input!


http://www.thepollspace.com/polls.ph...=75&category=0


did you mean to use Nicolas, Steven (Stephen) or Robert? i
certainly hope so, because actually naming the poor child with
a diminuative is unkind. it's hard enough to get along in the
adult world without being saddled with a 'baby nickname' as
your given name.


Maybe the guy doesn't know English and those names sound fine in his
language?


And if we proposed Sasha or Dima for a boy child, and a Russian speaker object
that those are diminuitives for real names, would you accept as a defense "oh
well, we don't know Russian and those names sound fine in our language"?


It's a perfectly valid objection.


Banty


Yes, in their own country. In our country, the child would not feel
saddled with a diminuitive, because the majority of the people would not
know it is a diminuitive.


Call me a stickler but I think any name should be used properly. I'm
not at all bothered by 'foreign' names, just use them (and spell them)
correctly!




  #19  
Old June 8th 07, 02:48 PM posted to misc.kids
toypup
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Posts: 1,227
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

On 8 Jun 2007 05:16:16 -0700, Banty wrote:


He could legally change his name, too! He could take some street name. Sure,
there's always some recourse.

But usually, it just doesn't work the way you suggest. Names can stick early,
and nicknames are used with some awareness that it's a nickname. Even if he
could manage what you suggest, your "Richard" will need to step up to receive
his high school diploma by the name "Ricky" nonetheless.

Banty


For many reasons (none illegal), I've managed to go through life with quite
a few aliases. I've had my name legally changed and I have a number of
nicknames. It isn't as difficult as you might imagine.

Sure, my parents will call me by my given name, but they also use one of my
nicknames and enough people use whatever name I give them that I can
maintain all my aliases. It is expecially useful when someone calls me by
name and I can't recall who it is. Depending on what they call me, I can
at least place how I'm supposed to know them.

Honestly, you may think it's a legal thing, but if "Ricky" wants to go down
the aisle as "Richard," I honestly don't think the school would protest.
The pronouncement of his name would be honored as much as someone
preferring "Tom" over "Thomas." In fact, when I walked, I remember just
having my name on a piece of paper and telling them how I want them to say
my name, writing it out phonetically, because the names weren't written on
the diplomas until after the ceremony.

The only time I must use my legal name is on legal papers, like the
mortgage. I just explain how my aliases work (they don't ever insist on a
driver's license) and it's fine.

Speaking from experience, changing your name or living with nicknames is
very easy.
  #20  
Old June 8th 07, 03:58 PM posted to misc.kids
Jeff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,321
Default Survey: best name for a newborn baby boy?

toypup wrote:
On 8 Jun 2007 05:16:16 -0700, Banty wrote:


He could legally change his name, too! He could take some street name. Sure,
there's always some recourse.

But usually, it just doesn't work the way you suggest. Names can stick early,
and nicknames are used with some awareness that it's a nickname. Even if he
could manage what you suggest, your "Richard" will need to step up to receive
his high school diploma by the name "Ricky" nonetheless.

Banty


For many reasons (none illegal), I've managed to go through life with quite
a few aliases. I've had my name legally changed and I have a number of
nicknames. It isn't as difficult as you might imagine.

Sure, my parents will call me by my given name, but they also use one of my
nicknames and enough people use whatever name I give them that I can
maintain all my aliases. It is expecially useful when someone calls me by
name and I can't recall who it is. Depending on what they call me, I can
at least place how I'm supposed to know them.

Honestly, you may think it's a legal thing, but if "Ricky" wants to go down
the aisle as "Richard," I honestly don't think the school would protest.
The pronouncement of his name would be honored as much as someone
preferring "Tom" over "Thomas." In fact, when I walked, I remember just
having my name on a piece of paper and telling them how I want them to say
my name, writing it out phonetically, because the names weren't written on
the diplomas until after the ceremony.

The only time I must use my legal name is on legal papers, like the
mortgage. I just explain how my aliases work (they don't ever insist on a
driver's license) and it's fine.

Speaking from experience, changing your name or living with nicknames is
very easy.


Shep Nuland was born Sherwin Nudelman. Shep is a surgeon and medical
historian at Yale the author of How We Die, Doctors and other very good
books.

He and his brother changed their last name in 1947. (Shep is his nickname.)

In his book, Lost in America: A Journey with My Father, Shep described
what it is like to legally change his family name. That is different
from legally changing his first name. For him, it was a big step forward
into a wider American life from his life with his immigrant father who
did speak English well and who wet himself more or less continually (his
dad had a bladder problem as a result of a bacterial infection that
spread to his spinal cord and brain).

I also knew another man who changed his last name so it wasn't so Jewish
sounding (he was Catholic). We never discussed it, but I don't think it
was a bid deal for him (it was a one letter change).

Jeff
 




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