A Parenting & kids forum. ParentingBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ParentingBanter.com forum » misc.kids » General
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old October 25th 03, 09:09 PM
Brandy Kurtz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

"Vicki" wrote in message ...
Today we received a warning letter for truancy for our 2nd grader. The
principal said she was concerned about dd's absences. I am not concerned
about dd's absences--she is bright, she knows the material [she's missed
five days this month, but received 100 on her test for materials covered.]
I don't think the teacher is concerned. But the principal said dd is only
allowed 5 excused absences per semester.

I'm not happy about the possibility of legal sanctions for keeping dd home
(she was sick this month, but I wouldn't hesitate to take her out of school
for other things we feel are important.) Can they prosecute us for truancy
when dd is top of her class? I don't see the harm to anyone in dd not
going. And she *will* miss more school at Thanksgiving (important family
time.)

We had planned to talk at school conferences about keeping dd home one day
per week, or bi-weekly, to enhance her education. But from what I've read
about truancy laws tonight, this doesn't seem to be allowable. Has anyone
done this or know if it is doable?

dd does not want to homeschool full-time--she likes seeing her friends at
school and we think this is good for her. We have discussed getting
appropriate challenge in her classroom--the teacher has been helpful, but
there is only so much she can do. We chose not to skip dd to the next grade
as she is already the youngest in her class.

Have others faced this truancy problem? How do you approach it? If this is
a law (5 days/semester,) does the principal have much leeway in enforcing
it? If not, then who do we talk with? The DA? Is it possible to
homeschool part-time (the days dd misses) and avoid a truancy enforcement?
Could we test out of second grade and attendance be optional?

dh is calling the principal next week, and we will meet with dd's teacher in
three weeks. I'd like to have a sense of our options before we go so we do
what's right by dd and cause the least distress to her teacher and principal
(who are quite nice.) Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
Vicki


I have faced truancy problems with my 7 year old, but due to medical
problems. In our district the children are allowed 20 days per 180
year of school. Anything over that requires a doctors note. Just
because your dd is so much smarter than all the rest of the kids and
you have financial influences in the school, they still can't bend the
rules. It is a fact that her teacher will have to spend extra time and
effort with your child to get the missed work done, which will take
time away from the children that need her guidance. Since you think
school is such a waste of time for her then you should just
home-school, and let her socialize after school hours.

Brandy
  #32  
Old October 25th 03, 09:13 PM
Denise
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?


"Brandy Kurtz" wrote in

I have faced truancy problems with my 7 year old, but due to medical
problems. In our district the children are allowed 20 days per 180
year of school. Anything over that requires a doctors note. Just
because your dd is so much smarter than all the rest of the kids and
you have financial influences in the school, they still can't bend the
rules. It is a fact that her teacher will have to spend extra time and
effort with your child to get the missed work done, which will take
time away from the children that need her guidance. Since you think
school is such a waste of time for her then you should just
home-school, and let her socialize after school hours.

Brandy



wow... talk about putting words in someone else's mouth. I must have missed
the post where the OP said all that.




-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
  #33  
Old October 25th 03, 09:34 PM
toypup
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?


"H Schinske" wrote in message
...
Sue ) wrote:

Well imo, you are essentially telling your daughter that rules don't

matter,
school doesn't matter and that she can stay home at any whim. What is she
going to do in the real adult world when she has a job? Stay home because
she feels like it.


And what are you telling your child when you say that school is important

to
stay in even when you are not learning anything? I think that is a message

that
is being put across to way too many bright kids, and one reason why so

many
people don't have the guts to leave dead-end jobs or work to make their

lives
more interesting.


The point is, she's in school and the school has rules. If she doesn't want
to follow those rules, she finds another school or homeschools or something
where the rules suit her. But, as long as she attends that school, she
needs to follow their rules. If she were in a dead-end job, she could quit
her job and find another more satisfying job, but as long as she keeps her
job (her choice), she needs to follow the rules.


  #34  
Old October 25th 03, 10:00 PM
dragonlady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

In article ,
"Denise" wrote:

"Brandy Kurtz" wrote in

I have faced truancy problems with my 7 year old, but due to medical
problems. In our district the children are allowed 20 days per 180
year of school. Anything over that requires a doctors note. Just
because your dd is so much smarter than all the rest of the kids and
you have financial influences in the school, they still can't bend the
rules. It is a fact that her teacher will have to spend extra time and
effort with your child to get the missed work done, which will take
time away from the children that need her guidance. Since you think
school is such a waste of time for her then you should just
home-school, and let her socialize after school hours.

Brandy



wow... talk about putting words in someone else's mouth. I must have missed
the post where the OP said all that.


While I might not have phrased it exactly the way Brandy did, I
certainly wondered why the OP felt it necessary to point out her
family's financial contributions.

I did understand why she was pointing out that her daughter wasn't
suffering academically -- that is, imo, relevant to the concerns about
missed classes. The fact that the family funded things in the community
didn't seem to be relevant.

meh
--
Children won't care how much you know until they know how much you care

  #35  
Old October 25th 03, 10:05 PM
Sue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

H Schinske wrote in message
And what are you telling your child when you say that school is important
to stay in even when you are not learning anything? I think that is a

message that is being put across to way too many bright kids, and one
reason why so many people don't have the guts to leave dead-end jobs or
work to make their live more interesting.


Then she needs to homeschool full time, if she is not happy. My kids are
learning in school and I am essentially happy with the education they have
had thus far. Like I said, if she is not happy then she should change. She
is sending the wrong message to her child by letting her go some of the
time, but taking her out for part of the time. NOT everyone thinks poorly of
public school and what they are getting.
--
Sue (mom to three girls)
I'm Just a Raggedy Ann in a Barbie Doll World...



  #36  
Old October 26th 03, 12:47 AM
dejablues
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?


"Vicki" wrote in message
news
Today we received a warning letter for truancy for our 2nd grader. The
principal said she was concerned about dd's absences. I am not concerned
about dd's absences--she is bright, she knows the material [she's missed
five days this month, but received 100 on her test for materials covered.]
I don't think the teacher is concerned. But the principal said dd is only
allowed 5 excused absences per semester.

I'm not happy about the possibility of legal sanctions for keeping dd home
(she was sick this month, but I wouldn't hesitate to take her out of

school
for other things we feel are important.)


You are teaching your daughter that it is OK to skip out on things that she
*has* to do in order to do things she (or you ) *wants* to do.


Can they prosecute us for truancy
when dd is top of her class? I don't see the harm to anyone in dd not
going. And she *will* miss more school at Thanksgiving (important family
time.)


There might be repercussions from other kids who think that your DD is
getting "special treatment" in being allowed to miss days of school to go to
museums, trips, etc., something that not everyone else gets to do.

We had planned to talk at school conferences about keeping dd home one day
per week, or bi-weekly, to enhance her education. But from what I've read
about truancy laws tonight, this doesn't seem to be allowable. Has anyone
done this or know if it is doable?

dd does not want to homeschool full-time--she likes seeing her friends at
school and we think this is good for her. We have discussed getting
appropriate challenge in her classroom--the teacher has been helpful, but
there is only so much she can do. We chose not to skip dd to the next

grade
as she is already the youngest in her class.


There there schools that still skip children? I though this was pretty much
abandoned by now. I skipped first grade (parents strongly pushed for it) ,
and while there were benefits, there were also significant drawbacks for me
throughout my school career.

Have others faced this truancy problem? How do you approach it? If this

is
a law (5 days/semester,) does the principal have much leeway in enforcing
it? If not, then who do we talk with? The DA? Is it possible to
homeschool part-time (the days dd misses) and avoid a truancy enforcement?
Could we test out of second grade and attendance be optional?

dh is calling the principal next week, and we will meet with dd's teacher

in
three weeks. I'd like to have a sense of our options before we go so we

do
what's right by dd and cause the least distress to her teacher and

principal
(who are quite nice.)


I bet they cringe when they see YOU coming!

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
Vicki




  #37  
Old October 26th 03, 12:50 AM
dejablues
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

I should have read your post before I answered, Sue. That is exactly what I
wanted to say, and you said it very well.


"Sue" wrote in message
...
Well imo, you are essentially telling your daughter that rules don't

matter,
school doesn't matter and that she can stay home at any whim. What is she
going to do in the real adult world when she has a job? Stay home because
she feels like it. What about college? She will need to be there all the
time in order to have all the information she needs to pass the class. If
she is sick that's one thing, but to stay home at any given time because

you
think it is important doesn't fly well with school. You are also setting
your daughter up for negative attention from the other kids at school.

They
will see her staying home, getting extra attention from the teacher

because
lessons will have to be repeated to her and possibly getting out of
essential tests and assignments. If she is missing so much, it ruins the
dynamics of the class. I don't mean the classroom persay, but things will
be discussed in class and your daughter will have no clue as to what went

on
the previous day. If you want to homeschool, then you need to do it full
time and not worry what your daughter wants because obviously you think

what
education she is getting is inadequate. Just because you think she is

smart
doesn't mean in reality that she is. She may be a little ahead in some

areas
and perhaps feel bored with some assignments, but she also may be feeling
left out when she misses so many days. If you want to supplement her

school
work, then perhaps you need to do it on the weekends and take away some of
her extracurricular activies that she has going.
--
Sue (mom to three girls)
I'm Just a Raggedy Ann in a Barbie Doll World...

Vicki wrote in message
news
Today we received a warning letter for truancy for our 2nd grader. The
principal said she was concerned about dd's absences. I am not

concerned
about dd's absences--she is bright, she knows the material [she's missed
five days this month, but received 100 on her test for materials

covered.]
I don't think the teacher is concerned. But the principal said dd is

only
allowed 5 excused absences per semester.

I'm not happy about the possibility of legal sanctions for keeping dd

home
(she was sick this month, but I wouldn't hesitate to take her out of

school
for other things we feel are important.) Can they prosecute us for

truancy
when dd is top of her class? I don't see the harm to anyone in dd not
going. And she *will* miss more school at Thanksgiving (important

family
time.)

We had planned to talk at school conferences about keeping dd home one

day
per week, or bi-weekly, to enhance her education. But from what I've

read
about truancy laws tonight, this doesn't seem to be allowable. Has

anyone
done this or know if it is doable?

dd does not want to homeschool full-time--she likes seeing her friends

at
school and we think this is good for her. We have discussed getting
appropriate challenge in her classroom--the teacher has been helpful,

but
there is only so much she can do. We chose not to skip dd to the next

grade
as she is already the youngest in her class.

Have others faced this truancy problem? How do you approach it? If

this
is
a law (5 days/semester,) does the principal have much leeway in

enforcing
it? If not, then who do we talk with? The DA? Is it possible to
homeschool part-time (the days dd misses) and avoid a truancy

enforcement?
Could we test out of second grade and attendance be optional?

dh is calling the principal next week, and we will meet with dd's

teacher
in
three weeks. I'd like to have a sense of our options before we go so we

do
what's right by dd and cause the least distress to her teacher and

principal
(who are quite nice.) Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
Vicki






  #38  
Old October 26th 03, 02:53 AM
Sue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

dejablues wrote in message
...
I should have read your post before I answered, Sue. That is exactly what
I wanted to say, and you said it very well.


Well, thank you. )
--
Sue (mom to three girls)
I'm Just a Raggedy Ann in a Barbie Doll World...



  #39  
Old October 26th 03, 01:51 PM
Donna Metler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?


"dragonlady" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Donna Metler" wrote:


The problem isn't the child who has a long-term absense-children on
homebound are considered to be in attendance under the law. But a child

who
misses a day here, a day there, whether due to illness, parents pulling

them
out for trips, or cutting to hang out at the mall is a big problem,

both
for funding (Average Daily Attendance) and for truancy statisitics.

If your child has a medical condition which may require frequent short
absenses, a homebound plan can be put into effect, where the child is
considered to be homebound, but attends school when able-this is part of

a
504 plan or an IEP (for Other Health Issues). With St. Jude's hospital

in my
district, we have had quite a few children at my school who are in

treatment
for Cancer, and attend school when they're feeling good, but stay home

when
they're reacting badly to chemotherapy, or when their resistance is

down.


Part of the problem is that, unless you really know what you are doing
or hook up with someone who does, the school can make it hard for you to
get the support to which you are legally entitled.

Several years ago, my daughter became severely ill with hepatitis.
Obviously, she was going to miss a lot of school. What I wanted was
support for homebound teachers for her classes, and, since we lived
across the street from the school, I wanted her to be able to return to
classes part time when she was strong enough first for Chemistry and
when she could handle two classes a day for Spanish -- the two classes
where actually being there mattered most. I spent several weeks getting
a run around from the school (the principal wanted me to withdraw her
from school all together and put her in independent study until she was
strong enough to come back full time). Then i got the expected call
from the county health department that does the contact tracing for Hep.
B. She asked if there was anything I needed. I described the situation
with the school, and she said she'd take care of it. Within less than
five hours, I had a call from the school giving us exactly what I'd been
asking for!

I am not an uneducated person, and I knew that what I was asking for was
legal and appropriate -- I just hadn't had the clout to pull the right
strings. Frankly, that makes me very angry on behalf of the kids whose
parents don't know their legal entitlements and never hook up with
someone who can help them.


The children's hospitals here are very good at working with the schools-and
it may be that with Le Bonheur and St. Jude's here, we've had to become more
flexible. In general, the larger the system, the more flexible they seem to
be able to be.

What frustrated me was a few years back. I was, at the time, on half-time
status following HELLP syndrome, after 8 weeks maternity leave. Meanwhile,
the same week I went back half-time, a teen mother (who had delivered her
son prematurely at the same gestational age I'd delivered mine). She had
been absent two weeks-and was being told by the school that if she didn't
come back, she'd fail for the year. Now, if she had been an employee, she
would not have been ALLOWED to go back to work for 6 weeks (or until she had
medical clearance). If she had given birth to a living baby, she would have
been allowed to enter a teen parenting program, which would have provided
extra supports and a modified schedule, both while recuperating from
delivery, and until graduation. I mean, she may have been all of 16, but she
had just gone through a difficult delivery and one of the worst emotional
situations you can go through-with little emotional support, because most
people really wanted to forget that the whole pregnancy had even happened!

It took three phone calls to get a 504 plan set up, which allowed her a
modified schedule for the rest of the year.



meh
--
Children won't care how much you know until they know how much you care



  #40  
Old October 26th 03, 01:53 PM
Ericka Kammerer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bright 2nd grader & school truancy / part-time home-school?

H Schinske wrote:

Ericka ) wrote:


I hear what you're trying to accomplish, but I
would be very surprised if you could get where you're
trying to go. I think you're going to find that homeschooling
is an all or nothing thing.


Actually this too depends on the district. There are a number of partial
homeschoolers where I live (though admittedly most are doing essentially all
the academic work at home, and coming in for things like band and gym).



Yes, I have heard of that--but wouldn't the kids then
be *required* to attend all of the pieces they signed up for
regularly? A child who is missing elementary school for a
day here and there, even if it's a planned particular day,
is almost certainly going to be missing bits and pieces of
any particular academic subject. One a theoretical level,
one might have better luck asking to homeschool a particular
subject or subjects and having the child attend school for
other subjects, but if the child is attending school for
some academic subjects I would think that would be
extremely difficult to work around logistically.

Best wishes,
Ericka

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
| Teen faces expulsion and felony for loaning girlfriend medicine Kane General 55 October 22nd 03 03:04 AM
PE/Recess time mandates Donna Metler General 190 October 2nd 03 01:26 PM
DCF CT monitor finds kids *worsen* while in state custody Kane General 8 August 13th 03 07:43 AM
Philly public schools go soda free! email to your school board Maurice General 1 July 14th 03 01:05 AM
Virtual school seeks Iowa funding [email protected] General 4 June 29th 03 12:55 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ParentingBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.