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Weird health headline



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 25th 05, 12:56 AM
Emily
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Default Weird health headline

Hi folks,

Just spotted this on Yahoo! news:

Caesarians Do Not Stop Postnatal Depression -Study

http://tinyurl.com/3sjuj

Why would anyone expect that they would?

Emily
  #2  
Old February 25th 05, 01:14 AM
Anne Rogers
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Why would anyone expect that they would?


to reduce the trauma and unexpected nature of birth. I'm not surprised that
overall it makes no difference, but each case should be considered
individually, because that is what women are, individuals. For me this means
staying out of the hospital, I won't hesitate to say post natal depressions
and post traumatic stress disorder if beforehand anyone comes up with any
reasons why I shouldn't birth at home.

Anne


  #3  
Old February 25th 05, 01:20 AM
Emily
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Anne Rogers wrote:
Why would anyone expect that they would?



to reduce the trauma and unexpected nature of birth. I'm not surprised that
overall it makes no difference, but each case should be considered
individually, because that is what women are, individuals. For me this means
staying out of the hospital, I won't hesitate to say post natal depressions
and post traumatic stress disorder if beforehand anyone comes up with any
reasons why I shouldn't birth at home.


I see. I guess that's my biases showing. I'm guessing that
if you look at 14,000 women, on average more will find abdominal
surgery (planned or otherwise) more traumatic than vaginal
birth. But you're right --- for someone at risk who knows she'll
find the c-section less traumatic, that might be a sensible
thing to do. That is, when one's weighing risks and benefits,
the risk of PND/benefit of reducing the chance of it are certainly
relevant factors!

Emily
  #4  
Old February 25th 05, 02:16 AM
Anne Rogers
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to reduce the trauma and unexpected nature of birth. I'm not surprised
that overall it makes no difference, but each case should be considered
individually, because that is what women are, individuals. For me this
means staying out of the hospital, I won't hesitate to say post natal
depressions and post traumatic stress disorder if beforehand anyone comes
up with any reasons why I shouldn't birth at home.


I see. I guess that's my biases showing. I'm guessing that
if you look at 14,000 women, on average more will find abdominal
surgery (planned or otherwise) more traumatic than vaginal
birth. But you're right --- for someone at risk who knows she'll
find the c-section less traumatic, that might be a sensible
thing to do. That is, when one's weighing risks and benefits,
the risk of PND/benefit of reducing the chance of it are certainly
relevant factors!

dunno, I'm not sure it's the actually surgery, I mean I definitely wouldn't
want to recover from surgery, I've had a laparoscopy which is very minor
compared to a c-section, even with that I couldn't move for 12 hours
afterwards, but comparing the emotional trauma, even though that laparoscopy
wasn't planned, I had 36 hours notice, it was way less traumatic than
Nathanael's arrival, the problem with that was I was induced due to PROM,
but I had a precipitate labour, I went from 5cm to delivery in 20 minutes,
which I think would freak anyone out, scheduling a c-section would avoid
that, my solution is to avoid induction, I think even if I have PROM again I
would refuse vaginal exams and monitor temperature, obviously there are some
reasons where induction would be warranted, so in that case I would be
requesting they drip is increased much much much more slowly.

Cheers

Anne


  #5  
Old February 25th 05, 08:05 PM
Larry McMahan
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Emily writes:
: Hi folks,

: Just spotted this on Yahoo! news:

: Caesarians Do Not Stop Postnatal Depression -Study

: http://tinyurl.com/3sjuj

: Why would anyone expect that they would?

: Emily

Hrumph! I wonder what kind of vaginal deliveries they compared
them to. I would expect that if they compared them to
unmedicated natural delivers without induction, augmentation,
or pain management, the the LOWEST PPD rate would be in the
unmedicated group!

Larry
  #6  
Old February 25th 05, 09:24 PM
Lucy
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"Larry McMahan" wrote in message
...
Hrumph! I wonder what kind of vaginal deliveries they compared
them to. I would expect that if they compared them to
unmedicated natural delivers without induction, augmentation,
or pain management, the the LOWEST PPD rate would be in the
unmedicated group!


Why is that?

Lucy


  #7  
Old February 25th 05, 10:03 PM
Lucy
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"Ericka Kammerer" wrote in message
...

By and large women who plan for and get unmedicated
births generally report themselves to be more satisfied with
their births and report that they felt most in control of
their births.


Thanks. That makes sense. I guess I hadn't realised that not being in
control of the birth was a cause of PPD. I had always just assumed it was a
chemical imbalance type thing.

Lucy


  #8  
Old February 25th 05, 10:07 PM
Ericka Kammerer
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Lucy wrote:
"Larry McMahan" wrote in message
...

Hrumph! I wonder what kind of vaginal deliveries they compared
them to. I would expect that if they compared them to
unmedicated natural delivers without induction, augmentation,
or pain management, the the LOWEST PPD rate would be in the
unmedicated group!



Why is that?


By and large women who plan for and get unmedicated
births generally report themselves to be more satisfied with
their births and report that they felt most in control of
their births.

Best wishes,
Ericka

  #9  
Old February 25th 05, 10:13 PM
Larry McMahan
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Ericka Kammerer writes:
: Lucy wrote:
: "Larry McMahan" wrote in message
: ...
:
:Hrumph! I wonder what kind of vaginal deliveries they compared
:them to. I would expect that if they compared them to
:unmedicated natural delivers without induction, augmentation,
:or pain management, the the LOWEST PPD rate would be in the
:unmedicated group!
:
:
: Why is that?

: By and large women who plan for and get unmedicated
: births generally report themselves to be more satisfied with
: their births and report that they felt most in control of
: their births.

: Best wishes,
: Ericka

What she said! This is probably the most important factor,
but I think there are others also.

Women who wind up with with excessive interventions (including
c-section) often feel that they have been railroaded by overly
aggressive caregivers who have not consulted them on their
options. This exacerbates any feeling of regret or inadequacy
they may have.

Also, the pain caused by augmentation drugs or the out-of-it
feeling eminating from narcotic pain relief make them feel that
they were "out of it" and not there for one of the most important
moments of their life. This also exacerbates feelings of regret
and inadequacy.

Larry

  #10  
Old February 25th 05, 10:38 PM
Ericka Kammerer
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Lucy wrote:

"Ericka Kammerer" wrote in message
...

By and large women who plan for and get unmedicated
births generally report themselves to be more satisfied with
their births and report that they felt most in control of
their births.



Thanks. That makes sense. I guess I hadn't realised that not being in
control of the birth was a cause of PPD. I had always just assumed it was a
chemical imbalance type thing.


It is, largely, but there are risk factors that make it
more or less likely to develop. A traumatic labor, lack of
control, etc. can be things that increase the likelihood.

Best wishes,
Ericka

 




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