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No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 2nd 07, 07:08 AM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking,alt.support.foster-parents
Greegor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,243
Default No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...

Kane wrote
Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party,


Didn't you read the article?

Article stated:
The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.

Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."

But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.

"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.

This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:

* No clear mission or guidelines.

* Sloppy and shoddy case files.

* An insular we-know-best culture.

* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")

* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


* A "random" approach to decision-making.
This one always begs for MORE FUNDING!

The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.

To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *








On Jun 2, 12:05 am, "0:-]" wrote:
.. or so says Greg. And uses one of the flabbiest pieces of "research"
I think I've ever seen.

So, what do you think about this article, Greg?

Anyone?

Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party, and refuse to accept
that the "shortcomings" had everything to do with short staffing and
lack of funds to DO the suggested remedial actions.

http://www.philly.com/dailynews/local/7780176.html

Philly.com
Cycle of abuse and neglect cited in blistering report
By WENDY RUDERMAN
215-854-2860
Furman
Furman

* Jill Porter | Report just more of the same, or will this one
bring change?
* A TRAGIC LEGACY AT DHS

The city's Department of Human Services failed David Furman as a kid.

And roughly two decades later, as a young father, Furman failed his
own 1-year-old son in the worst possible way: He killed him.

Furman had spent his toddler years moving from one foster home to
another, including one where a foster mother later confided that he
had been molested. Now the 20-year-old Frankford man is in prison for
shaking his crying infant to death in a frustrated rage.

Furman's unstable childhood and the violent death of little Jahmir
Furman tell a sad, but all too common, story of a cycle of abused or
neglected children once under DHS care who grew to become murderous
parents.

In short, the past sins of DHS are often visited on the kids of
today's still-troubled DHS system, a new report examining the
child-welfare agency found.

Jahmir's death was one of 52 child fatalities from July 2001 through
August 2006 reviewed by a mayoral panel tasked with ending a pattern
of failure within DHS. Half of the 52 children were under DHS care
when they died; the other half had either previously received DHS
services or were born into families formerly in the system.

In the report made public yesterday, the panel found that a "shocking
number" of parents who intentionally or unintentionally killed their
children had been in the DHS system as children.

"Many of the parents who should have been protected by the state when
they were children were not well-served," the panel concludes.

"The inattention to their traumatic experiences has resulted in
predictable, intergenerational, devastating, dysfunctional behavior."

Of the 52 deaths reviewed by the panel, 20 were victims of unspeakable
abuse. They were beaten, strangled, starved, and drowned. The bodies
of seven other children who died showed signs of previous physical
abuse, though the city's medical examiner was unable to rule the
deaths as homicides.

The rest - 25 of the 52 - died from unsafe sleeping conditions,
unintentional accidents, illness, or sudden unexplained infant death.

In fact, babies were the most likely to die: 34 of the 52 were
infants. In 50 percent of the infant deaths, at least one parent had
been in DHS as a child, according to the report.

These parents, said one panel member, represent "failures of our child
welfare system - without a doubt."

Some of the infant deaths might have been prevented if DHS caseworkers
had been taught to look for not-so-obvious safety risks, like a
caretaker's history of child abuse or neglect.

"As former victims of child abuse, they often were dealing with drug
abuse, mental health problems, and domestic violence," the report
states. "This strongly suggests that the agency did not recognize the
risk inherent in having been a victim of maltreatment."

The panel recommended that DHS implement by June 30 a uniform safety
checklist for caseworkers to use when they visit homes. The list will
include both obvious safety risks, like whether there is faulty
electrical wiring in the house, and less obvious risks, such as
whether the mom has a new boyfriend staying at the house.

The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.

Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."

But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.

"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.

This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:

* No clear mission or guidelines.

* Sloppy and shoddy case files.

* An insular we-know-best culture.

* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")

* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.

* A "random" approach to decision-making.

The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.

To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *

Updated 12:00 AM EDT


  #2  
Old June 2nd 07, 12:39 PM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking,alt.support.foster-parents
lostintranslation
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...

On Jun 2, 2:08 am, Greegor wrote:
Kane wrote

Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party,


Didn't you read the article?

Article stated:



The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.


Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."


But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.


"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.


This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:


* No clear mission or guidelines.


* Sloppy and shoddy case files.


* An insular we-know-best culture.


* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")


* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


* A "random" approach to decision-making.
This one always begs for MORE FUNDING!

The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.


To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *


On Jun 2, 12:05 am, "0:-]" wrote:

.. or so says Greg. And uses one of the flabbiest pieces of "research"
I think I've ever seen.


So, what do you think about this article, Greg?


Anyone?


Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party, and refuse to accept
that the "shortcomings" had everything to do with short staffing and
lack of funds to DO the suggested remedial actions.


http://www.philly.com/dailynews/local/7780176.html


Philly.com
Cycle of abuse and neglect cited in blistering report
By WENDY RUDERMAN
215-854-2860
Furman
Furman


* Jill Porter | Report just more of the same, or will this one
bring change?
* A TRAGIC LEGACY AT DHS


The city's Department of Human Services failed David Furman as a kid.


And roughly two decades later, as a young father, Furman failed his
own 1-year-old son in the worst possible way: He killed him.


Furman had spent his toddler years moving from one foster home to
another, including one where a foster mother later confided that he
had been molested. Now the 20-year-old Frankford man is in prison for
shaking his crying infant to death in a frustrated rage.


Furman's unstable childhood and the violent death of little Jahmir
Furman tell a sad, but all too common, story of a cycle of abused or
neglected children once under DHS care who grew to become murderous
parents.


In short, the past sins of DHS are often visited on the kids of
today's still-troubled DHS system, a new report examining the
child-welfare agency found.


Jahmir's death was one of 52 child fatalities from July 2001 through
August 2006 reviewed by a mayoral panel tasked with ending a pattern
of failure within DHS. Half of the 52 children were under DHS care
when they died; the other half had either previously received DHS
services or were born into families formerly in the system.


In the report made public yesterday, the panel found that a "shocking
number" of parents who intentionally or unintentionally killed their
children had been in the DHS system as children.


"Many of the parents who should have been protected by the state when
they were children were not well-served," the panel concludes.


"The inattention to their traumatic experiences has resulted in
predictable, intergenerational, devastating, dysfunctional behavior."


Of the 52 deaths reviewed by the panel, 20 were victims of unspeakable
abuse. They were beaten, strangled, starved, and drowned. The bodies
of seven other children who died showed signs of previous physical
abuse, though the city's medical examiner was unable to rule the
deaths as homicides.


The rest - 25 of the 52 - died from unsafe sleeping conditions,
unintentional accidents, illness, or sudden unexplained infant death.


In fact, babies were the most likely to die: 34 of the 52 were
infants. In 50 percent of the infant deaths, at least one parent had
been in DHS as a child, according to the report.


These parents, said one panel member, represent "failures of our child
welfare system - without a doubt."


Some of the infant deaths might have been prevented if DHS caseworkers
had been taught to look for not-so-obvious safety risks, like a
caretaker's history of child abuse or neglect.


"As former victims of child abuse, they often were dealing with drug
abuse, mental health problems, and domestic violence," the report
states. "This strongly suggests that the agency did not recognize the
risk inherent in having been a victim of maltreatment."


The panel recommended that DHS implement by June 30 a uniform safety
checklist for caseworkers to use when they visit homes. The list will
include both obvious safety risks, like whether there is faulty
electrical wiring in the house, and less obvious risks, such as
whether the mom has a new boyfriend staying at the house.


The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.


Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."


But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.


"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.


This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:


* No clear mission or guidelines.


* Sloppy and shoddy case files.


* An insular we-know-best culture.


* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")


* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


* A "random" approach to decision-making.


The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.


To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *


Updated 12:00 AM EDT



Greg.....all you can do, after reading this article is point out how
badly that particular cps agency is failing? ok, then

If you are claiming there is no such thing as a cycle of abuse, you
are so far out of the ballgame, you might as well go home.

I'm not going to quote articles or any of the textbooks I have sitting
here. I will however, tell you a true story which I saw unfold before
my eyes over several years.

My uncle met his 2nd wife in the late 70's. She was divorced with two
kids...a son aged 12 a daughter 10. During her first marriage, there
was a daily dose of DV between her and her ex. Her ex also beat the
kids (beyond the 'normal' spanking). I have seen pictures of those
kids with bruises up and down their bodies and serious blajened eyes.
Thinking about it now majes my chest tightend up. I heard from them
how bad it was. They had been removed from their home by cps and
placed in foster care for 2 years. Thankfully, they had wonderful FPs
who cared for them for 14 months. My 'step cousins' didn't want to go
home. Their mom eventually kicked her ex out, got a divorce, and her
kids came home. After she met and married my uncle, her ex went nuts
and came to the hjouse one night. I was there when this happened.
The first thing he did was grab his daughter and started hitting her.
He was screaming that he wouldn't stop hitting her until her mom left
with him, bringing the kids, and leaving my uncle. I don't know who
called but the police showed up before he could harm anyone more.

Fast forward several years. My female step cousin is out on her own
at 15.....addicted to drugs and pregnant. The state took her son at
birth because he was born addicted to more things than I care to
count. After a year, she gets her son back only to have him removed 3
months later because she was abusing him. She would feed him when she
saw fit. He was dirty and she beat him. No one from the family had
constant contact with her so no one knew how bad it was for her son.
He was eventually adopted.

Fast forward several more years. Her brother gets married As soon
as he got married, he started hitting his wife. His mind couldn't
comprehend the right way to treat a spouse even though my uncle never
hit his mom. It's what was ingrained in him from his early years that
registered. They had a child about a year or so after they married.
They had me provide daycare for their son. I was running a licensed
daycare out of my home. I was dropping him off every night to help my
cousin and his wife out as they only had one car. One night, I was
dropping him off. I walked into world war 3. Not only was my cousin
hitting his w3ife but when his son ran through the house to give daddy
a hug, he hit his son. I scooped his son up and told his parents that
I was keeping him for the night and to get their **** together. Being
a mandated reporter, I called it in. CPS was out at their house that
night. They were told that they had to get into marriage and
individual counseling and parenting classes, among a few other NEEDED
services. Their son stayed with me for a few days then went to my
cousin's inlaws home for 3 months.

Things are great for them now. They went on, bought a lovely home,
have 5 great kids....no DV nor child abuse/neglect going on.
Hopefully THAT circle/cycle of abuse has ended. My female cousin,
unfortunately, never got the help she needed to kill the cycle. She
had, and abused two more children...lost them to the repective states
she was living in, and eventually killed herself in 1999.

So please greg, show me where there is no circle of abuse. Prove to
us that no such thing exists.

  #3  
Old June 2nd 07, 01:15 PM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking,alt.support.foster-parents
lostintranslation
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...

On Jun 2, 7:39 am, lostintranslation
wrote:
On Jun 2, 2:08 am, Greegor wrote:



Kane wrote


Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party,


Didn't you read the article?


Article stated:


The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.


Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."


But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.


"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.


This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:


* No clear mission or guidelines.


* Sloppy and shoddy case files.


* An insular we-know-best culture.


* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")


* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


* A "random" approach to decision-making.
This one always begs for MORE FUNDING!


The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.


To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *


On Jun 2, 12:05 am, "0:-]" wrote:


.. or so says Greg. And uses one of the flabbiest pieces of "research"
I think I've ever seen.


So, what do you think about this article, Greg?


Anyone?


Give Greg a hand here. He's likely to be tongue tied as usual, or go
off on a rant about CPS being the culpable party, and refuse to accept
that the "shortcomings" had everything to do with short staffing and
lack of funds to DO the suggested remedial actions.


http://www.philly.com/dailynews/local/7780176.html


Philly.com
Cycle of abuse and neglect cited in blistering report
By WENDY RUDERMAN
215-854-2860
Furman
Furman


* Jill Porter | Report just more of the same, or will this one
bring change?
* A TRAGIC LEGACY AT DHS


The city's Department of Human Services failed David Furman as a kid.


And roughly two decades later, as a young father, Furman failed his
own 1-year-old son in the worst possible way: He killed him.


Furman had spent his toddler years moving from one foster home to
another, including one where a foster mother later confided that he
had been molested. Now the 20-year-old Frankford man is in prison for
shaking his crying infant to death in a frustrated rage.


Furman's unstable childhood and the violent death of little Jahmir
Furman tell a sad, but all too common, story of a cycle of abused or
neglected children once under DHS care who grew to become murderous
parents.


In short, the past sins of DHS are often visited on the kids of
today's still-troubled DHS system, a new report examining the
child-welfare agency found.


Jahmir's death was one of 52 child fatalities from July 2001 through
August 2006 reviewed by a mayoral panel tasked with ending a pattern
of failure within DHS. Half of the 52 children were under DHS care
when they died; the other half had either previously received DHS
services or were born into families formerly in the system.


In the report made public yesterday, the panel found that a "shocking
number" of parents who intentionally or unintentionally killed their
children had been in the DHS system as children.


"Many of the parents who should have been protected by the state when
they were children were not well-served," the panel concludes.


"The inattention to their traumatic experiences has resulted in
predictable, intergenerational, devastating, dysfunctional behavior."


Of the 52 deaths reviewed by the panel, 20 were victims of unspeakable
abuse. They were beaten, strangled, starved, and drowned. The bodies
of seven other children who died showed signs of previous physical
abuse, though the city's medical examiner was unable to rule the
deaths as homicides.


The rest - 25 of the 52 - died from unsafe sleeping conditions,
unintentional accidents, illness, or sudden unexplained infant death.


In fact, babies were the most likely to die: 34 of the 52 were
infants. In 50 percent of the infant deaths, at least one parent had
been in DHS as a child, according to the report.


These parents, said one panel member, represent "failures of our child
welfare system - without a doubt."


Some of the infant deaths might have been prevented if DHS caseworkers
had been taught to look for not-so-obvious safety risks, like a
caretaker's history of child abuse or neglect.


"As former victims of child abuse, they often were dealing with drug
abuse, mental health problems, and domestic violence," the report
states. "This strongly suggests that the agency did not recognize the
risk inherent in having been a victim of maltreatment."


The panel recommended that DHS implement by June 30 a uniform safety
checklist for caseworkers to use when they visit homes. The list will
include both obvious safety risks, like whether there is faulty
electrical wiring in the house, and less obvious risks, such as
whether the mom has a new boyfriend staying at the house.


The nine-member panel, appointed by Mayor Street last fall, conducted
about 800 interviews and studied thousands of DHS files over the past
six months. The result is a 218-page report identifying problems
within DHS and recommendations for fixing them.


Street yesterday called the report a "road map to lasting reform."


But DHS has been down this road before. In the past two decades, there
have been at least 22 reports examining problems within the agency.
While some of the problems were corrected over the years, many
persisted - and still do.


"To a large extent, the recent history of this agency has been crisis,
analysis, report, and inadequate change," this new report notes.


This report, like many of its predecessors, found the agency is still
foundering with many of the same ills:


* No clear mission or guidelines.


* Sloppy and shoddy case files.


* An insular we-know-best culture.


* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")


* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


* A "random" approach to decision-making.


The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.


To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *


Updated 12:00 AM EDT


Greg.....all you can do, after reading this article is point out how
badly that particular cps agency is failing? ok, then

If you are claiming there is no such thing as a cycle of abuse, you
are so far out of the ballgame, you might as well go home.

I'm not going to quote articles or any of the textbooks I have sitting
here. I will however, tell you a true story which I saw unfold before
my eyes over several years.

My uncle met his 2nd wife in the late 70's. She was divorced with two
kids...a son aged 12 a daughter 10. During her first marriage, there
was a daily dose of DV between her and her ex. Her ex also beat the
kids (beyond the 'normal' spanking). I have seen pictures of those
kids with bruises up and down their bodies and serious blajened eyes.
Thinking about it now majes my chest tightend up. I heard from them
how bad it was. They had been removed from their home by cps and
placed in foster care for 2 years. Thankfully, they had wonderful FPs
who cared for them for 14 months. My 'step cousins' didn't want to go
home. Their mom eventually kicked her ex out, got a divorce, and her
kids came home. After she met and married my uncle, her ex went nuts
and came to the hjouse one night. I was there when this happened.
The first thing he did was grab his daughter and started hitting her.
He was screaming that he wouldn't stop hitting her until her mom left
with him, bringing the kids, and leaving my uncle. I don't know who
called but the police showed up before he could harm anyone more.

Fast forward several years. My female step cousin is out on her own
at 15.....addicted to drugs and pregnant. The state took her son at
birth because he was born addicted to more things than I care to
count. After a year, she gets her son back only to have him removed 3
months later because she was abusing him. She would feed him when she
saw fit. He was dirty and she beat him. No one from
...

read more



To clarify....They were in foster care for 14 mos and spent the
remaining time with their grandparents.

*sorry for the typos recently...Im typing one handed due to a broken
hand and wrist*

  #4  
Old June 3rd 07, 09:19 AM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking,alt.support.foster-parents
Greegor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,243
Default No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...

Article
* An insular we-know-best culture.


Kane wrote
Opinion. And rephrasing a trait we WANT in professionals.

Would you want your doctor to take advice on HOW to treat a patient
based on the lab tech, the x ray tech, the building janitor service,
the insurance company (now there's a prime example of major 'f'ed
up') haranging the doctor claiming THEY, not her, KNOW BEST, and each
has a different "cure" for the patient.


You are idolizing ignorant CASEWORKERS as
""professionals"" and you thought comparing their
arrogance to "God Complex" in DOCTORS?

* Caseworkers who lack compassion, professionalism and respect for
families. (One DHS client interviewed by the panel said she felt more
"disrespect by DHS workers than by thugs on the street.")


Oh, wonderful.

Now the "patient" is going to rate the doctor that has a troublesome
patient that will not follow her recommendations and orders.
MMMmhhhh....

And they found ONE? R R R R RR R R R


Does your hyperactivity medicine calm your "pirate" tic?

Hell, I could find hundreds in a single community.

That does not mean what they say is automatically TRUE.


Well the PANEL thought so.

* Unresponsive DHS workers who fail to return repeated phone calls.


Yeah, like they only have one a day to respond to, and nothing else to
do but sit around drinking tea and filing their nails.

Staff shortages.

In fact, being terse and short with people tends to be common among
workers from every profession and industry and business and agency
where the person is overloaded and has little hope they will ever
catch up.


Lots of people work at fast paced jobs.
Acting like an ass is not justified by that.

You **** asses sit on your butt, doing much of nothing but
"sabbatical," Greg, and criticize people doing one of the toughest
jobs there are.


Was I criticizing or was the PANEL of TWELVE??
Are you cussing about the PANEL?
Please be clear on that.


Kane wrote
YOU EVEN DEFEND THE PARENTS WHO INJURE AND KILL THESE SAME WORKERS.


Was this lie one you decided was moral or ethical?

Removing kids from their family is OF COURSE a dangerous undertaking.

How much outrage do you think an innocent parent should feel
when a caseworker removes a child using horrible LIES or exaggeration?
Understanding WHY and HOW parents feel backed into a corner
is CONSIDERABLY different from condoning violence.


You people aren't even as good as [s]. At least I can grow nice roses
with manure.


With social graces like this, no wonder you're so paranoid!
You've worked quite hard to create hatred for yourself.
Perhaps like another Don, you tilt at windmills and
see yourself as a hero by doing this?

* A "random" approach to decision-making.
This one always begs for MORE FUNDING!


From outside looking in, a worker that has far more to do in a day, an
repeatedly has brushfires to fight (those OTHER phone calls they do
respond to, and the required trips to "the field" as they happily
label them,) can look very much like they are going at it "random,"
but in fact they are NOT working on one case at a time, and completing
it before they take on the next.

They are doing this piece on case A, then spending a few hours,
sometimes only minutes, entering the notes on case B, then answering a
call from the court (they DO tend to answer those before a client
call, but then wouldn't you?), then going to a two hour meeting for a
family strength needs based service plan committee with five people
all of whom will tell THEM how to manage the case THEY WILL GET BURNED
FOR IF THEY MAKE MAJOR MISTAKES.


Um, Kane, lots of people have jobs that involve
doing many things at the same time, time management
and switching between tasks.
Some much MORE than what caseworkers actually do.

But what did I tell you here about this?
Are you bitching about what the PANEL wrote?

I want you to read this next paragraph out loud, see if you can get
the gist of it, then compare it to what Wexler asks for.

Hint: he wants to move money from CHILD SAFETY, to family support
services. Enforcement to social work.

Would that BOTH COULD BE PROPERLY FUNDED AT ADEQUATE LEVELS, just as
pilot programs have shown WORK.







The main problem, panelists found, was the agency has strayed from its
core mission of child safety. It has gotten bogged down helping
families who lack food and shelter - problems that should be handled
by other city agencies. Families end up in the DHS system simply
because they are poor, panelists said.


Oh, and you DON'T, Greg, remember what I've been harping about for the
past week (and years, in fact) about NOT throwing everything in the
book at CPS and using and funding the proper agencies to meet the
needs of the families?

You are awfully silent on this one, aren't you?


Hardly! New incentive program! Work or be fired!
Remember the caseworker who was SO BUSY
she held a job as a school teacher while she
was on the clock as a caseworker?
The PANEL probably found some more of those people.

To keep kids safe, the panel urged DHS workers to check up on children
every month, rather than every six months as currently mandated. *


THAT, Greg, should demonstrate to you just how on top of reality this
report is. .... IT IS ALREADY FEDERAL MANDATE THAT THE CHECKUPS COME
MONTHLY.

HAS BEEN FOR A CONSIDERABLE TIME NOW.


The PANEL found out it hasn't been taking place monthly.

In other words, stupid, you have nothing cogent to say. You simply
want the easy path, blame CPS for everything and even when different
critics have opposing views, support both because they criticize CPS.
Nice going.

You are useless. I hope you don't vote.


I LOVE that you blame me for what the PANEL found!
The whole PANEL who wrote the report is OUT TO GET YOU!



  #5  
Old June 5th 07, 11:07 AM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking,alt.support.foster-parents
Greegor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,243
Default No Such Thing as "Cycle of Abuse." ...

You smart mouth isolate pieces of what I comment,
than waltz right on by critical information such as
this with NO comment.


Is your Megalomania causing you to be irritated
if somebody else doesn't hinge on your every word?

Bwahahaha!

 




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