A Parenting & kids forum. ParentingBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ParentingBanter.com forum » misc.kids » General
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 20th 06, 08:53 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

Hi:

I am aware the average age at which long-term retention of memories is
3. What the earliest age known at which a person has had long-term
memories that were retained in adulthood [i.e. something similar to the
Guiness Book of Records for earliest memory]?

I seem to be able to remember things that happened when I was 2 years
old and slightly earlier. I am now 22 years old.

I used to live in Stamford, Connecticut.

I really like the house in Stamford, Connecticut. It was on 263
Strawberry Hill Avenue. I lived in that house for the 1st 2.5 years of
my life. I was born on 10-22-83. It was my favorite house. But I wasn't
in that house for the entire first 2.5 years. I had gone to India in
'86 from January to July. I could differentiate Stamford and India from
each other. I can remember returning from India to Connecticut. I
recall feeling a sigh of relief after I came back to Stamford. After I
came back we only stayed in the Stamford house for 3 days [well, my
parents think it was 3 days! For me it felt much longer, even though I
loved the Stamford house!] before moving to a borough called "Queens"
in New York. I recall begging to go back to Stamford after we move to
Queens.

My family is Indian. There are some Indian songs that they played that
remind me of the house in Stamford, Connecticut. When listening to
those songs, I actally feel like I am in that house again! It is just
so amazing and real.

I can remember seeing one of my aunts in the hospital. This was when my
aunt was giving birth to her son in September of '85. I obviously
didn't know why she was in the hospital but I do remember her lying on
a bed. I can remember her being very uncomfortable. This memory has
been confirmed by my parents as the day my aunt gave birth to her son.
During this, I was a month less than 2 years of age!

Scientifically [at least in current research] what deteremines how
early long-term memory starts, whether these memories are retained, and
how long they are retained?


Thanks,

Green

  #2  
Old March 20th 06, 09:44 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood


"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi:

I am aware the average age at which long-term retention of memories is
3. What the earliest age known at which a person has had long-term
memories that were retained in adulthood [i.e. something similar to the
Guiness Book of Records for earliest memory]?

I seem to be able to remember things that happened when I was 2 years
old and slightly earlier. I am now 22 years old.

I remember waving goodbye to my sister going to playgroup. She left
playgroup when I was 1 year 9 months. I think it would have been at least 2
months before that because of the weather.

Debbie


  #3  
Old March 20th 06, 09:51 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

Can't answer the question about what science says, but I was briefly
hospitalised when I was young. I have a memory of the layout of the ward,
of where my cot was in the ward relative to the doors, the windows, the
other beds and cots, etc., and I remember standing at the bars and people
talking to me and something about how I felt. For years I thought I must
have made these memories up, because I was "obviously" too young to
remember. Recently I checked with my mother: she confirmed that the details
in my memory are actually right. Whilst of course we had talked about the
fact that I'd been in hospital as I grew up (I have a scar from it), she's
pretty sure neither she nor anyone else would have talked about the layout
of the ward etc. - no reason to. I tend now to believe that it's a real
memory. It's not inconceivable that I could have coincidentally imagined
the right details, but there are quite a few of them - it seems more
unlikely that I'd have got them all right by chance.

I was 14.5 months old!

That was very much a one off, connected with an experience that must have
been stressful. After that, the next thing I'm pretty sure I remember is a
mental event from when I was a bit over 2 (maybe 26 months), and "fullish"
memory starts at the birth of my brother, when I was 3 years 2 months.

Sidheag
DS Colin Oct 27 2003

  #4  
Old March 20th 06, 11:29 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood


Hi --

I have a few memories that date back to sometime between the ages of 12
and 24 months. I have a few memories of my grandfather, for example,
and of my other grandparents house in Philadelphia.

My 10-year old son has only just started *losing* memories that date
from 12-24 months of age. (He commented on it recently, somewhat
distressed. I think the loss has to do with entering pubescence.) It
will be interesting to see what he remembers when he finishes
adolescence.

My mother remembers learning to walk. She was about 12 months old at
the time, and can date it by the fact that the memory was at a house in
Connecticut which they stopped renting when the country entered
WWII. (Gas rationing.)

All of my own memories of that period are kind of like mini videoclips.
Sight, sound, but very little if any by way of story-line or emotion.

--Beth Kevles

http://web.mit.edu/kevles/www/nomilk.html -- a page for the milk-allergic
Disclaimer: Nothing in this message should be construed as medical
advice. Please consult with your own medical practicioner.

NOTE: No email is read at my MIT address. Use the AOL one if you would
like me to reply.
  #5  
Old March 21st 06, 03:24 AM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood


Sidheag McCormack wrote:
Can't answer the question about what science says, but I was briefly
hospitalised when I was young. I have a memory of the layout of the ward,
of where my cot was in the ward relative to the doors, the windows, the
other beds and cots, etc., and I remember standing at the bars and people
talking to me and something about how I felt. For years I thought I must
have made these memories up, because I was "obviously" too young to
remember. Recently I checked with my mother: she confirmed that the details
in my memory are actually right. Whilst of course we had talked about the
fact that I'd been in hospital as I grew up (I have a scar from it), she's
pretty sure neither she nor anyone else would have talked about the layout
of the ward etc. - no reason to. I tend now to believe that it's a real
memory. It's not inconceivable that I could have coincidentally imagined
the right details, but there are quite a few of them - it seems more
unlikely that I'd have got them all right by chance.

I was 14.5 months old!

That was very much a one off, connected with an experience that must have
been stressful. After that, the next thing I'm pretty sure I remember is a
mental event from when I was a bit over 2 (maybe 26 months), and "fullish"
memory starts at the birth of my brother, when I was 3 years 2 months.

Sidheag
DS Colin Oct 27 2003


Are there any sound that bring back your infantile memories. As I said,
certain songs bring back memories for me. But not just songs. The tones
on the AM radio [caused by electric/magnetic disruptions], the tones
you get on the telephone when you dial numbers for TDD, and dail-up
modem also give me a strong feel of the house in Stamford. Many
electronic sounds tend to give this feeling of that houses. We had a
radio receiver that was built-in to the house, so maybe this does make
sense. The AM radio is usually full of audio interferences from
surrounding electronic devices [be it from telephones, modems, fax
machines, teletype machine, even a switch].

I have a Casio SA-11 Keyboard, it has some nice electronic sounds
resembling that of common day electronic devices.

  #6  
Old March 21st 06, 05:40 AM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

Radium wrote:

I am aware the average age at which long-term retention of memories is
3. What the earliest age known at which a person has had long-term
memories that were retained in adulthood [i.e. something similar to the
Guiness Book of Records for earliest memory]?


Studies show that people actually start to keep
long-term memories at around age 2. That is
based on studies using babies at different ages
and checking if they recall objects or rooms
after two weeks.

There is also a theory that long-term memories
occur only with speech/language development.
So, it is entirely probable that one would
remember events shortly after one started to
speak.

-- Anita --
  #7  
Old March 21st 06, 11:34 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

Radium writes:

Are there any sound that bring back your infantile memories.


No, curiously - my earliest memories are silent-film like, with the sense
of communication but no actual sound. Of course, from the age of 3 or so
I remember sounds.

Sidheag
DS Colin Oct 27 2003

  #8  
Old March 21st 06, 11:36 PM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

Irrational Number writes:

Studies show that people actually start to keep long-term memories at
around age 2. That is based on studies using babies at different ages
and checking if they recall objects or rooms after two weeks.


Presumbly, though, it wouldn't be ethical to test the idea that younger
children may remember especially traumatic events! For that we're bound to
be limited to asking people who happened to suffer such events what they
remember and then trying to check authenticity.

Sidheag
DS Colin Oct 27 2003
  #9  
Old March 22nd 06, 12:44 AM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood


Sidheag McCormack wrote:
Radium writes:

Are there any sound that bring back your infantile memories.


No, curiously - my earliest memories are silent-film like, with the sense
of communication but no actual sound. Of course, from the age of 3 or so
I remember sounds.

Sidheag
DS Colin Oct 27 2003


Well, in my case, the memories are mostly visual, but certain
songs/sound are what bring back those memories best. Last summer and in
the summer of '96, I visited the outside of my old house in Stamford.
The house did not really bring back much memories, because I have grown
a lot since the time we were living the, so the house looked very
different to me. In addition, visual stimuli is rather poor at causing
flashbacks. Usually sounds and smells are the best manners at which
memories are triggered. Most of my memories of that house are highly
emotional and involve an extremely psychdelic and surreal feel, much
like that of outer space and paranormal activity. No negative feelings
in those memories. They are certainly strange but all positive.

My ultimate dream would be to take myself back the time I was in
Stamford and keep myself withing that timeframe, rountinely
experiencing those lovely memories in physical reality. Sadly, thats
not possible given the state of today's technology. I guess the best
way for me to re-experience Stamford is to listen to those favorite
sounds/songs of mine. LOL.

Long-term memory has two components. One is the sensory-discriminative
component [i.e. ability to see what happened in the past through those
memories]. The other is the affective-motivational component [the
emotional affects of -- association with -- those memories]. AFAIK, the
affective-motivation component usually starts earlier in life that the
sensory-discrimintive component. This probably explains to me why I can
vividly feel those "Stamford" memories of mine but have a hard time
explaining them [even to myself] objectively.

  #10  
Old March 22nd 06, 01:18 AM posted to misc.kids
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Earliest Memories Remembered During Adulthood

my earliest memory is from age 26 months

it was October 1961, my parents bought a new 1962 Chevrolet, nd I threw a
fit... "thats not our car, etc, etc,etc"

took both parents , and the salesman to get me in the Chevrolet the first
time


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living Memories [email protected] General 0 September 19th 05 03:24 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ParentingBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.