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DSS uses new method to protect children: Changes in child-protectiveservices, coming in July, allow social workers and parents to work togetherto benefit children....



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 23rd 07, 03:31 AM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.support.foster-parents,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking
fx
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,848
Default DSS uses new method to protect children: Changes in child-protectiveservices, coming in July, allow social workers and parents to work togetherto benefit children....

DSS uses new method to protect children

Pilot program to be expanded

By CHRISTINA HALE

Staff Writer

http://www.wdnweb.com/articles/2007/...ews/news02.txt

Changes in child-protective services, coming in July, allow social
workers and parents to work together to benefit children, according to
workers with the Beaufort County Department of Social Services.

The North Carolina Multiple Response System, which allows for more
parent involvement in some cases, started with 10 pilot counties in 2002
and will soon be implemented in every county in the state, according the
N.C. Division of Social Services.

Lorre Bowen, program manager for child-protective services, said DSS has
been implementing the program gradually over the last few years.

“The state has been fine-tuning it, and they are more confident in the
concept than they were initially,” she said in a recent interview.

By July, this response system will be applied to all cases in Beaufort
County.

Bowen said the system helps “preserve the family unit” and “empowers
parents.”

Previously, a report of a “low-risk” situation such as a dirty house
meant the child was “pulled out of class, questioned and examined even
before the parents had the opportunity to sit down and speak with us,”
Bowen said. “Now, we meet together and they know why we’re coming.”

DSS Director Jim Harriett said if the parents refuse a meeting, DSS can
still proceed with an investigation.

Scott Cullom, a child-welfare supervisor, said the system is “less
incident focused, and instead deals with the whole picture.”

“Instead of looking into who did what, address the problems in the
family,” he said. During a Child and Family Team Meeting, other
professionals from the community can attend.

DSS in Beaufort County currently has 140 cases open, involving 250
children. Each month, the department receives an average of 60 reports
of child mistreatment and looks into about 40 of them, Cullom said.

The numbers are up this month, Cullom said. “We receive 90 reports and
accepted 61.”

Under the state’s previous assessment approach, one person would go out
and investigate what happened without the parents’ knowledge, gathering
information from neighbors, doctors and school administrators — everyone
but the parents.

If the report turned out to be true, another person would work with the
family to change the problem in that household.

Barry Johnson, a supervisor with child welfare, said with the new
approach, only one person is assigned through the life of the case. “No
matter what the level of maltreatment, all parents were placed on a
central registry in which all counties had access,” he said.

Social workers were required to have two meetings per family per month.
The number of meetings has gone up to one per week for every family. The
amount of time a social worker can spend on one case was extended from
30 days to 45 days.

The state’s new response system will require 150 to 200 additional hours
for DSS employees. “Ninety-minute meetings per family with one meeting
per week and a 15 family case load adds up in a month,” Johnson said.

This will decrease in the long run because families will not be coming
back into the system as much, Johnson said.

“The main difference is that we will focus on educating the parents on
how to resolve the problems,” Harriett said. He called the approach
“more supportive and less punitive.”

Johnson said a statewide 2003-2005 research study of the new response
system said it “didn’t affect the safety of the child.”

Harriett said a misconception is that a child will not be honest in
front of his or her parents. In the less serious cases, such as children
being left home alone “the kids are going to speak right up,” he said.

“In cases of sexual abuse, a child clams up and doesn’t want to talk.
There are telltale signs that let us know something’s not right,”
Harriett said.

If social workers believe the child feels threatened in front of the
parents, DSS can take action immediately.

“If we have to change tracks we can,” Cullom said.

In DSS, “the child comes first, then the goal is to help the family,”
Bowen said.






[[ will wonders never ceased, someone in the system actually Trying to
do what is right for a change?]] FX
  #2  
Old June 23rd 07, 11:41 AM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.support.foster-parents,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking
Mrs. Robinson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default DSS uses new method to protect children: Changes in child-protectiveservices, coming in July, allow social workers and parents to work togetherto benefit children....

0:-] wrote:
On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 19:31:22 -0700, fx wrote:
...."I'm your man, Kane...and I'll stay on top of this new development
for the good of the group and sensible CPS reform."..

Why thanks, fx. I knew you'd wake up eventually.

Hint: This "system" has been tried before. I wrote on this just last
week.

The trick?

Oh, nothing spectacular...JUST THE PUCKERING MONEY IT TAKES was partly
(heavily) contributed by charity funding sources, AND PUCKERING RUNS
OUT.

What CPS ends up with, as I said before, is a program in name only,
watered down, workers spread like grease on old dried toast, and the
'program' doesn't "fail," the "workers," do and you ****ants get to
malign workers once again.

Notice the "pilot programs" mention?

EXACTLY What I described.

In other words, damn near any half assed program WILL WORK IF YOU FUND
IT ADEQUATELY.

Notice they expect to have a caseload of 15 per worker?

DON'T YOU PUCKERING BELIEVE IT.

The instant the state legislative CPS oversight committee takes a
gander at that in action, they WILL politicize it and reduce the
numbers of workers.

But they'll hide that. Know how?

It's the cutest little trick.

How do you get fewer workers but not fire anyone?

YOU DO NOT FILL BEHIND THE NATURAL ATTRITION OF WORKERS. Some will
leave for health reasons, many will retire, some will simply seek
better paying work. Some will move with their spouse. Some will die.

AND EVERY POSITION VACATED will, at the order of that committee,
remain UNFILLED, with caseloads being gradually dumped on the
remaining workers.

I've seen this time and time again over the past three decades.

Caseloads will rise, workers will HAVE TO CUT CORNERS or completely
abandon a case. Very dangerous stuff and the politicos could give a
****, as long as they can point the constituents to their "cost
cutting measures," and take a bow just before election time.

CPS is traditionally used for this. First cut, last funded.
Everywhere.

A little intelligent thinking on your part (though you've done little
enough of that in your other manifested identities) would see this.

No, fx. Don't celebrate.

Not until you see the politicos actually increase and hold funding and
at the very least incremental...annual would be nice...increases in
funding that reflect the real world.

Watch and see if I'm not right. DO IT sucker. You will NOT like the
outcome...or you will because instead of blaming the real culprits in
system screw ups, the LEGISLATURES, you can just blame CPS again, and
sit in your pile of warm **** with your happy grin.

You will think you are "right."

When in fact you are ignorant, and dumb as a stump....no worse, dumb
as Greg.

DSS uses new method to protect children

Pilot program to be expanded

Oh sure. just like always. For **** sakes read history. State after
state has had this wonderful "revelation" about better "practice."

And it falls on it's ass every puckering TIME.

Watch for the kink down the road. A reduction in funding. It WILL
happen...as it has all over the country.

Time and again.

0:]

By CHRISTINA HALE

Staff Writer

http://www.wdnweb.com/articles/2007/...ews/news02.txt

Changes in child-protective services, coming in July, allow social
workers and parents to work together to benefit children, according to
workers with the Beaufort County Department of Social Services.

The North Carolina Multiple Response System, which allows for more
parent involvement in some cases, started with 10 pilot counties in 2002
and will soon be implemented in every county in the state, according the
N.C. Division of Social Services.

Lorre Bowen, program manager for child-protective services, said DSS has
been implementing the program gradually over the last few years.

“The state has been fine-tuning it, and they are more confident in the
concept than they were initially,” she said in a recent interview.

By July, this response system will be applied to all cases in Beaufort
County.

Bowen said the system helps “preserve the family unit” and “empowers
parents.”

Previously, a report of a “low-risk” situation such as a dirty house
meant the child was “pulled out of class, questioned and examined even
before the parents had the opportunity to sit down and speak with us,”
Bowen said. “Now, we meet together and they know why we’re coming.”

DSS Director Jim Harriett said if the parents refuse a meeting, DSS can
still proceed with an investigation.

Scott Cullom, a child-welfare supervisor, said the system is “less
incident focused, and instead deals with the whole picture.”

“Instead of looking into who did what, address the problems in the
family,” he said. During a Child and Family Team Meeting, other
professionals from the community can attend.

DSS in Beaufort County currently has 140 cases open, involving 250
children. Each month, the department receives an average of 60 reports
of child mistreatment and looks into about 40 of them, Cullom said.

The numbers are up this month, Cullom said. “We receive 90 reports and
accepted 61.”

Under the state’s previous assessment approach, one person would go out
and investigate what happened without the parents’ knowledge, gathering
information from neighbors, doctors and school administrators — everyone
but the parents.

If the report turned out to be true, another person would work with the
family to change the problem in that household.

Barry Johnson, a supervisor with child welfare, said with the new
approach, only one person is assigned through the life of the case. “No
matter what the level of maltreatment, all parents were placed on a
central registry in which all counties had access,” he said.

Social workers were required to have two meetings per family per month.
The number of meetings has gone up to one per week for every family. The
amount of time a social worker can spend on one case was extended from
30 days to 45 days.

The state’s new response system will require 150 to 200 additional hours
for DSS employees. “Ninety-minute meetings per family with one meeting
per week and a 15 family case load adds up in a month,” Johnson said.

This will decrease in the long run because families will not be coming
back into the system as much, Johnson said.

“The main difference is that we will focus on educating the parents on
how to resolve the problems,” Harriett said. He called the approach
“more supportive and less punitive.”

Johnson said a statewide 2003-2005 research study of the new response
system said it “didn’t affect the safety of the child.”

Harriett said a misconception is that a child will not be honest in
front of his or her parents. In the less serious cases, such as children
being left home alone “the kids are going to speak right up,” he said.

“In cases of sexual abuse, a child clams up and doesn’t want to talk.
There are telltale signs that let us know something’s not right,”
Harriett said.

If social workers believe the child feels threatened in front of the
parents, DSS can take action immediately.

“If we have to change tracks we can,” Cullom said.

In DSS, “the child comes first, then the goal is to help the family,”
Bowen said.






[[ will wonders never ceased, someone in the system actually Trying to
do what is right for a change?]] FX



Don't count yer chickens -- it the new rage -- alternate response
non-victim -- just CPS speak for intervening in families who have done
nothing wrong. It brings the practice of micro managing families of
non-victims into the mainstream.

Never fall for the ruse that CPS is going to 'give families a fair
shake' -- it's all smoke and mirrors. lol.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

  #3  
Old June 23rd 07, 12:55 PM posted to alt.support.child-protective-services,alt.support.foster-parents,alt.dads-rights.unmoderated,alt.parenting.spanking
Mrs. Robinson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default DSS uses new method to protect children: Changes in child-protectiveservices, coming in July, allow social workers and parents to work togetherto benefit children....

fx wrote:
DSS uses new method to protect children

Pilot program to be expanded

By CHRISTINA HALE

Staff Writer

http://www.wdnweb.com/articles/2007/...ews/news02.txt

Changes in child-protective services, coming in July, allow social
workers and parents to work together to benefit children, according to
workers with the Beaufort County Department of Social Services.

The North Carolina Multiple Response System, which allows for more
parent involvement in some cases, started with 10 pilot counties in 2002
and will soon be implemented in every county in the state, according the
N.C. Division of Social Services.

Lorre Bowen, program manager for child-protective services, said DSS has
been implementing the program gradually over the last few years.

“The state has been fine-tuning it, and they are more confident in the
concept than they were initially,” she said in a recent interview.

By July, this response system will be applied to all cases in Beaufort
County.

Bowen said the system helps “preserve the family unit” and “empowers
parents.”

Previously, a report of a “low-risk” situation such as a dirty house
meant the child was “pulled out of class, questioned and examined even
before the parents had the opportunity to sit down and speak with us,”
Bowen said. “Now, we meet together and they know why we’re coming.”


But nobody asks, "Is it governments job to insure we're all good
housekeepers?".

So, instead of treating our children, in secret, like little criminals
because someone alleges 'dirty house' -- CPS will now give us advance
notice that we'll all be treated like criminals because someone said we
have a dirty house.


DSS Director Jim Harriett said if the parents refuse a meeting, DSS can
still proceed with an investigation.

Scott Cullom, a child-welfare supervisor, said the system is “less
incident focused, and instead deals with the whole picture.”

“Instead of looking into who did what, address the problems in the
family,” he said. During a Child and Family Team Meeting, other
professionals from the community can attend.

DSS in Beaufort County currently has 140 cases open, involving 250
children. Each month, the department receives an average of 60 reports
of child mistreatment and looks into about 40 of them, Cullom said.

The numbers are up this month, Cullom said. “We receive 90 reports and
accepted 61.”

Under the state’s previous assessment approach, one person would go out
and investigate what happened without the parents’ knowledge, gathering
information from neighbors, doctors and school administrators — everyone
but the parents.

If the report turned out to be true, another person would work with the
family to change the problem in that household.


But now, they'll be no 'investigation', so silly details like the report
being 'true' need not be considered.


Barry Johnson, a supervisor with child welfare, said with the new
approach, only one person is assigned through the life of the case. “No
matter what the level of maltreatment, all parents were placed on a
central registry in which all counties had access,” he said.

Social workers were required to have two meetings per family per month.
The number of meetings has gone up to one per week for every family. The
amount of time a social worker can spend on one case was extended from
30 days to 45 days.

The state’s new response system will require 150 to 200 additional hours
for DSS employees. “Ninety-minute meetings per family with one meeting
per week and a 15 family case load adds up in a month,” Johnson said.

This will decrease in the long run because families will not be coming
back into the system as much, Johnson said.

“The main difference is that we will focus on educating the parents on
how to resolve the problems,” Harriett said. He called the approach
“more supportive and less punitive.”


Yup -- [re]educating parents -- sometimes the truth is told.


Johnson said a statewide 2003-2005 research study of the new response
system said it “didn’t affect the safety of the child.”

Harriett said a misconception is that a child will not be honest in
front of his or her parents. In the less serious cases, such as children
being left home alone “the kids are going to speak right up,” he said.

“In cases of sexual abuse, a child clams up and doesn’t want to talk.
There are telltale signs that let us know something’s not right,”
Harriett said.

If social workers believe the child feels threatened in front of the
parents, DSS can take action immediately.

“If we have to change tracks we can,” Cullom said.

In DSS, “the child comes first, then the goal is to help the family,”
Bowen said.


Family is the enemy of Empire. Much better is a Stazi 'snitch network'
where neighbors snitch on neighbors, husbands snitch on wifes, and
children snitch on parents.

CPS is not incompetent or 'disfunctional' or 'broken' -- it is serving
Empires purpose well.









[[ will wonders never ceased, someone in the system actually Trying to
do what is right for a change?]] FX


--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 




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