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Canadian Government Declares Silicones (Etc.) Toxic to Environment ... but not to Human Beings ? ? ? ?



 
 
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Old June 3rd 08, 03:53 AM posted to alt.support.breast-implant,can.politics,sci.environment,misc.health.alternative,misc.kids.breastfeeding
Ilena Rose
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Default Canadian Government Declares Silicones (Etc.) Toxic to Environment ... but not to Human Beings ? ? ? ?

From Health Lover, Ilena Rosenthal
www.BreastImplantAwareness.org/
http://breastimplantawareness.blogspot.com

WoW. While I am thrilled to see that the Canadian Government is taking
seriously the many concerns regarding various synthetic chemicals ...
silicones included.

This statement, however, sounds like it comes straight from the
doublespeak of George Orwell's "Ministry of Truth" in 1984.

EXCERPT: "The government concludes these synthetic chemicals do not
pose a risk to human health, but rather should be declared toxic to
the environment."

What ? ? ?

Dr. Zuckerman's words are true and clear:

EXCERPT: "A more accurate assessment would have been to say that the
health hazards are unknown for individual use of products with D4,
because they have not been adequately studied. I would think that
women of childbearing age would be especially concerned about having
breast implants because of possible infertility problems that could
result from D4."

I'm still astounded the Canadian Government can claim no possible risk
to human life, when this science mentioned below is unfolding:

EXCERPT: "The government's newly released risk assessment of D4, found
in silicone breast implants, states the synthetic chemical impairs
fertility. It also flags a finding of the Danish Environmental
Protection Agency, identifying the liver as a "target organ for D4
exposures."

Please help us keep the pressure on Health Canada ... it's time for
them ... and the FDA ... to stop caving into the demands of the
medical device makers.

From Health Lover, Ilena Rosenthal
www.BreastImplantAwareness.org/
http://breastimplantawareness.blogspot.com

http://www.canada.com/topics/news/na...d=b0eeb176-6b3...



Sarah Schmidt , Canwest News Service
Published: Friday, May 16

OTTAWA - The federal government announced Friday it intends to slap a
toxic label on a bunch of chemicals used in everyday products from
chewing gum to cosmetics as well as in controversial devices like
silicone breast implants because they are either harmful to human
health or the environment.

The 11 chemicals include Vinyl acetate, a carcinogen used as a base in
chewing gum, and Cyclohexasiloxane, used as building blocks of
silicone used in breast implants.

If industry fails to offer new information within 60 days to reverse
course, Ottawa will classify these chemicals as toxic and kick start a
process that could lead to a ban in certain products, as with
bisphenol A in baby bottles.

Silicone breast implants were pulled from the market in Canada in 1992
amid concerns they were unsafe for women. In 2006, they were once
again made freely available.

In the case of the synthetic chemicals belonging to the
Cyclohexasiloxane family - D4, D5 and D6 - the government is proposing
an additional step to ensure their virtual elimination from the
environment.

In addition to being found in silicone fluids, these synthetic
chemicals are found in cleaning compounds, cosmetics and personal care
products, including shampoos, creams, lotions, and antiperspirants.
D5, in particular, is a common ingredient to give products a silky
texture.

The government concludes these synthetic chemicals do not pose a risk
to human health, but rather should be declared toxic to the
environment.

"Canadians expect their government to protect the environment from
harmful chemicals, and that's why we are taking action," said
Environmental Minister John Baird.

Six of the 11 chemicals are flagged as toxic to human health; the
government said it will work with industry to reduce exposures to two
of these substances.

The health toxins a Vinyl acetate, used in food additives, paints,
sealants and plastics; C.I. Pigment Yellow 34 and Red 103, a colourant
used in paints, dyes, inks, and plastics; Thiourea, used in electronic
products, insecticides and textiles; isoprene, used in rubber and
plastic manufacturing; and Oxirane, used in paints, coatings and
adhesives.

The announcement comes after a lengthy review of the chemicals under
the government's Chemicals Management Plan involving about 200
substances. It is the most comprehensive chemical review currently
being undertaken in the world.

Mike Patton, spokesman for the Canadian Cosmetics, Toiletries and
Fragrances Association, praised the process and welcomed the
conclusions.

"There's nothing in this batch that poses a health concern for us. But
our other interest is environmental impact, and we'll work with the
government to minimize or eliminate entirely any environmental
impact."

Thiourea, a carcinogen, used to be a common ingredient in
personal-care products, but it hasn't been used by the industry for
some time, said Patton.

Women health advocates say they'll use this new information to push
for a review of the October, 2006, lifting the ban on silicone breast
implants.

The government's newly released risk assessment of D4, found in
silicone breast implants, states the synthetic chemical impairs
fertility. It also flags a finding of the Danish Environmental
Protection Agency, identifying the liver as a "target organ for D4
exposures."

But the government concludes the substance "is not entering the
environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that
constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or
health."

Madeline Bosco, a nurse who is executive director of Canadian Women's
Health Network and public appointee to the government's advisory
committee on breast implants, says research shows silicone is not
well-contained in the implants and diffuses throughout women's bodies.

"This is extremely good news from my perspective. It helps move the
toxicology world, which has already been raising questions about
silicone, into the health products process."

Epidemiologist Diane Zuckerman, president of the National Research
Center for Women & Families based in Washington, characterized Health
Canada's decision "confusing and illogical. If D4 is dangerous to the
environment, on what basis is the government concluding that it is not
dangerous when implanted inside the human body or repeatedly used on
the human body?

"A more accurate assessment would have been to say that the health
hazards are unknown for individual use of products with D4, because
they have not been adequately studied. I would think that women of
childbearing age would be especially concerned about having breast
implants because of possible infertility problems that could result
from D4."

Silicone implants were pulled from the market in Canada in 1992 amid
concerns they were unsafe for women. In October, 2006, Health Canada
changed course and made them freely available to women with the caveat
that "no medical device is 100 per cent safe."

Until then, only breast implants filled with saline were licensed for
sale in Canada.

The October, 2006 decision came just months after Health Canada's
scientific advisory committee said questions "had not been
sufficiently addressed" about potential health risks should the gels
bleed or leak into women's bodies and about whether the implants
increase the risk of auto-immune diseases in the long term.

The government is also proposing to list Acid Blue 80, a colourant
used in cosmetics and glass cleaner, as toxic to the environment.
 




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