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Have you tried an electric toothbrush?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 3rd 04, 07:12 AM
John Doe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

Since they are all over the store shelves now, I know you have seen them.

If you haven't tried one of the new, inexpensive electric toothbrushes, you
don't know what you are missing. I have been using the things for years and
love them. The last post subject line which mentioned them in this group
was mine in December 2000.

They are much easier to use and they clean like a regular toothbrush never
could. They will make your teeth cleaner than ever before. And you can use
less toothpaste per brushing.

My favorite is (I wont mention the brand) the one with two moving brush
heads. It is just fantastic. I love all that action (maybe because I have a
big mouth, but that is another subject).

If you want to save lots of money, get a NiMH battery charger with
batteries. But, even tho the package might say the toothbrush is
waterproof, do not let your kid(s) play with it in water. Batteries will
rupture and might spill their dangerous contents when the battery terminals
are shorted by accidental exposure to water.

Electric toothbrushes are marvelous for cleaning teeth thoroughly, the easy
way.

Do it for the kids!





--
Is wannabe_princess still here? How's it going?
Have fun.
  #2  
Old May 3rd 04, 11:02 AM
Nic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
Since they are all over the store shelves now, I know you have seen them.

If you haven't tried one of the new, inexpensive electric toothbrushes,

you
don't know what you are missing. I have been using the things for years

and
love them. The last post subject line which mentioned them in this group
was mine in December 2000.

They are much easier to use and they clean like a regular toothbrush never
could. They will make your teeth cleaner than ever before. And you can use
less toothpaste per brushing.

My favorite is (I wont mention the brand) the one with two moving brush
heads. It is just fantastic. I love all that action (maybe because I have

a
big mouth, but that is another subject).

If you want to save lots of money, get a NiMH battery charger with
batteries. But, even tho the package might say the toothbrush is
waterproof, do not let your kid(s) play with it in water. Batteries will
rupture and might spill their dangerous contents when the battery

terminals
are shorted by accidental exposure to water.

Electric toothbrushes are marvelous for cleaning teeth thoroughly, the

easy
way.

Do it for the kids!




My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal brush or a electric
brush. If your teeth are going to rot, they will rot regardless of what kind
of brush you use. He said those kind of brushes are good for eldery, frail,
disabled or children. I think they make you lazy.

Having said that I use mine but only sometimes. When I think of it and the
kids aren't around as they pefer normal tooth brushes (like me) sicne we
usually all go to bed at the same time (or in the morning etc)

Nic






--
Is wannabe_princess still here? How's it going?
Have fun.



  #3  
Old May 3rd 04, 01:15 PM
John Doe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

"Nic" wrote
"John Doe" wrote in message


My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal brush or a electric
brush.


Then he (or she) is wrong.

If your teeth are going to rot, they will rot regardless of what kind
of brush you use.


Also what he said? Maybe he doesn't want to offend your bias.

Given the same time and effort, an electric toothbrush is light years
better for cleaning teeth.

He said those kind of brushes are good for eldery, frail, disabled
or children.


That is a good troll, IMO. Nice touch.

I just got back from a wonderful inline skating session. Awesome sport. The
weather is cool and crisp with a breeze out of the north. It was much fun.
Skate over to my house some day and we will go skating together (nevermind
the Pacific).

I think they make you lazy.


Looking at your next paragraph, one might figure you have been using the
electric toothbrush way too much.

Having said that I use mine but only sometimes. When I think of it and
the kids aren't around as they pefer normal tooth brushes (like me)
sicne we usually all go to bed at the same time (or in the morning
etc)


I think your careless bias in this matter comes from the fact you "think
technology is moving forward to fast!"

How can you type on a PC keyboard without creating sparks?





Nic




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From: "Nic"
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Subject: Have you tried an electric toothbrush?
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  #4  
Old May 3rd 04, 04:42 PM
CBI
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

"Nic" wrote in message . au...

My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal brush or a electric
brush.


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference. The one caveate,
especially with kids, is that if they have more fun with it and use it
longer it may help.

--
CBI, MD
  #5  
Old May 4th 04, 12:36 AM
John Doe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

(CBI) wrote
"Nic" wrote in message


My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal brush or a
electric brush.


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference.


Care to provide a quotation/citation? An issue date?

Your signature is "CBI, MD". Does that suggest you are a doctor? A doctor
of misinformation?

Where do you practice?

If you have any experience with hand versus power tools, you should be able
to understand the difference between polishing/cleaning something by hand
versus an electrical polisher.

Me thinks some people are feeling a little guilty for not taking good care
of their kids dental health. And you should IMO, unless perhaps you live in
Siberia/China and your economy isn't good enough to readily provide such
things. Here in the United States, electric toothbrushes cost little as $5
(five US dollars). The rechargable batteries cost extra but will save money
and trips to the store in a short while.

Without a doubt, there is a huge positive difference using an electric
toothbrush.

The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they have more fun
with it and use it longer it may help.


I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a long time. Like
any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on things. An
electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that abraisive action
in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the same amount of cleaning
in much less time, long as you reach the same areas. Since you hold the
brush head still, applying it to one point is very easy. So you not only
have the pulsing action, you can concentrate the action in the exact right
area (like in the back of your mouth). But again, not good to do so for a
long time, IMO.

Mine has very soft bristles, so I can use it for quite a while. Over the
years, it has even removed plaque. My teeth have never been cleaner (I also
floss regularly).

But seriously. If you haven't tried one, and you can buy one easily, go for
it. Your kids will be much better off for your good/experienced advice.



--
CBI, MD


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Subject: Have you tried an electric toothbrush?
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  #6  
Old May 4th 04, 03:18 AM
CBI
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
(CBI) wrote
"Nic" wrote in message


My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal

brush or a
electric brush.


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference.


Care to provide a quotation/citation? An issue date?


It was discussed in the December 2003 issue. This is only
available on-line for a fee.

Now that I have shown you mine would you care to do the
same?


If you have any experience with hand versus power tools,

you should be able
to understand the difference between polishing/cleaning

something by hand
versus an electrical polisher.


Yes, that analogy seems to makes sense. In this case it
appears to be wrong, but I certainly understand the logic
and appeal of it. If you know anything about analogies you
should know that they do not always apply to similar
situations and it is not always obvious why not. Truth be
told - I would have guessed that they do better as well but
it would have been just a guess. Better than my (or your)
guessing CR decided to test it and they found no difference.
Sorry if you don't like the results but unless you have some
other information they are the only ones we have (that and
the opinion of the dentist already mentioned).



Me thinks some people are feeling a little guilty for not

taking good care
of their kids dental health. And you should IMO, unless

perhaps you live in
Siberia/China and your economy isn't good enough to

readily provide such
things. Here in the United States, electric toothbrushes

cost little as $5
(five US dollars). The rechargable batteries cost extra

but will save money
and trips to the store in a short while.


I agree. If they work better then it is a small investment.
If they work better.....


Without a doubt, there is a huge positive difference using

an electric
toothbrush.


Apparently it is not without a doubt.


The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they

have more fun
with it and use it longer it may help.


I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a

long time. Like
any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on

things. An
electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that

abraisive action
in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the same

amount of cleaning
in much less time, long as you reach the same areas. Since

you hold the
brush head still, applying it to one point is very easy.

So you not only
have the pulsing action, you can concentrate the action in

the exact right
area (like in the back of your mouth). But again, not good

to do so for a
long time, IMO.


You just love to speculate, don't you? I actually think that
is a good thing so long as you can keep track of the
difference between what is your own idle speculations and
what is established fact (or at least one with a modicum of
factual support).

--
CBI, MD


  #7  
Old May 4th 04, 08:52 AM
John Doe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

"CBI" wrote
"John Doe" wrote in message
(CBI) wrote


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference.


Care to provide a quotation/citation? An issue date?


It was discussed in the December 2003 issue. This is only
available on-line for a fee.
Now that I have shown you mine would you care to do the
same?


I wont subscribe to Consumer Reports to seek proof of your claim.
Perhaps what you recall isn't what was said. Or maybe they screwed up
royally.

If you know how to use the Usenet archives, you have no need for
Consumer Reports. I don't mean everything users say is true, sometimes
even the consensus could be wrong. Sometimes you have to read between
the lines. In any case, the wealth of available information/opinions is
greater than any other single source in the world, and growing.

A quick search provides me some very enthusiastic and experienced
collaboration, and no experienced disagreement.

Here are some experienced quotes from the archives. You can find them
from Google's search page.

....Just dropped and broke my electric toothbrush, being a diabetic it`s
a must. [because it keeps her mouth cleaner which lessens risk of
infection]

....For the past 15 years I've been flossing, and brushing daily with an
electric toothbrush. Every 5 years ... the doc says, "Everything looks
good. Keep it up."

....ALL MY GRANDKIDS HAVE ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSHES. ALL MY GROWN KIDS HAVE
THEM ALSO. YES, I THINK THEY DO A MUCH BETTER JOB OF CLEANING THEIR
TEETH. ALL OF THEM! ...ALL THREE OF MINE HAS ONE. AND THEY LOVE THEM
[the thread started with an all capital letter post, apparently the
others playfully followed suit]

....Ebay is a good bet. A lot of them are half price.
.......I think I would prefer a new one ;-)
[I just thot that funny]

If you have any experience with hand versus power tools,
you should be able to understand the difference between
polishing/cleaning something by hand versus an electrical
polisher.


Yes, that analogy seems to makes sense.


I would call it a fairly simple comparison.

In this case it appears to be wrong, but I certainly understand the
logic and appeal of it.


It is practically the same thing.

If you know anything about analogies you should know that they do not
always apply to similar situations and it is not always obvious why
not. Truth be told - I would have guessed that they do better as well


Go with your feelings.

but it would have been just a guess.


But some things are obvious.

Better than my (or your) guessing CR decided to test it and they found
no difference.


Mine is not guessing. I have been testing it for years. I posted about
them here 3 1/2 years ago. I know the difference between electric and
manual brushing. I can see and feel the difference.

Sorry if you don't like the results but unless you have some
other information they are the only ones we have (that and
the opinion of the dentist already mentioned).


I think that is called "double hearsay". I pointed out the bias of that
author.

Me thinks some people are feeling a little guilty for not taking good
care of their kids dental health. And you should IMO, unless perhaps
you live in Siberia/China and your economy isn't good enough to
readily provide such things. Here in the United States, electric
toothbrushes cost little as $5 (five US dollars). The rechargable
batteries cost extra but will save money and trips to the store in a
short while.


I agree. If they work better then it is a small investment.


Yup, if you live in a land where things are plentiful. Otherwise, maybe
you still might not enjoy the idea.

If they work better.....


They are simply wonderful for those of us who appreciate good dental
health.

Thru my own experience, I know without a doubt there is a big positive
difference using an electric toothbrush (given device integrity and
normal use).

The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they have more
fun with it and use it longer it may help.


I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a long time.
Like any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on
things. An electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that
abraisive action in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the
same amount of cleaning in much less time, long as you reach the same
areas. Since you hold the brush head still, applying it to one point
is very easy. So you not only have the pulsing action, you can
concentrate the action in the exact right area (like in the back of
your mouth). But again, not good to do so for a long time, IMO.


You just love to speculate, don't you?


Very much. Inventing things requires lots of speculation. Sometimes I
speculate until dizzy. But the above is mostly fact.

I actually think that is a good thing so long as you can keep track of
the difference between what is your own idle speculations and
what is established fact (or at least one with a modicum of
factual support).


Since I am not an engineer, I have to build the things I invent and
design. I turn speculation into fact all the time.

Since I have 32 teeth and years experience using various electric
toothbrushes, there isn't anything speculative about my opinion here.

Again. Buying rechargeable batteries and a recharger is important, not
to test the thing but to make the thing worthwhile for practical use.

BTW. The new Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) rechargeables are much better
than the old. They last 40% longer, do not degrade when only partially
discharged, and do not hurt the environment like NiCads used to. Any
modern device should use NiMHs. And never charge other types of
batteries in a NiMH charger unless the directions plainly state
otherwise.







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  #8  
Old May 4th 04, 02:14 PM
Nic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
(CBI) wrote
"Nic" in message


My dentist says it makes no differance using a normal brush or a
electric brush.


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference.


Care to provide a quotation/citation? An issue date?

Your signature is "CBI, MD". Does that suggest you are a doctor? A doctor
of misinformation?

Where do you practice?

If you have any experience with hand versus power tools, you should be

able
to understand the difference between polishing/cleaning something by hand
versus an electrical polisher.

Me thinks some people are feeling a little guilty for not taking good care
of their kids dental health. And you should IMO, unless perhaps you live

in
Siberia/China and your economy isn't good enough to readily provide such
things. Here in the United States, electric toothbrushes cost little as $5
(five US dollars). The rechargable batteries cost extra but will save

money
and trips to the store in a short while.


Here thou (where I live) electric toothbrushes aren't as cheap as $5. The
normal price range is from $50 (being the cheapest and they go upwards to
$130 something. So working out you need to spend at least $50 to start of
with, to start brushing, not including tooth heads, That means buying
normal toothbrushes at the cost little of $1 you could buy 50 ( or more on
specail) which would last at least 10 years working out that you replace
your toothbrush every 3 to 4 months as it is good hygenine to do so.

I would assume that electical toothbrush heads would need to be replaced
about the same legnth of time and at $ 30 dollars or more for a pack of 4
makes it expensive option to use.


Without a doubt, there is a huge positive difference using an electric
toothbrush.


Postive difference ? where ? says who ?



The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they have more fun
with it and use it longer it may help.


I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a long time. Like
any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on things. An
electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that abraisive action
in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the same amount of cleaning
in much less time, long as you reach the same areas. Since you hold the
brush head still, applying it to one point is very easy. So you not only
have the pulsing action, you can concentrate the action in the exact right
area (like in the back of your mouth). But again, not good to do so for a
long time, IMO.


hang on... your saying use caution ? why ? If it is that much better as you
claim, then why do you need to use caution ?


Mine has very soft bristles, so I can use it for quite a while. Over the
years, it has even removed plaque. My teeth have never been cleaner (I

also
floss regularly).

But seriously. If you haven't tried one, and you can buy one easily, go

for
it. Your kids will be much better off for your good/experienced advice.


How do you know what my kids would like ? and what makes you think they
would be better off ?

I guess you wanted eveyone to go out and buy a electric toothbrush and be
glad they did ?
I guess you didn't expect anyone to say it isn't all what you make it to be.

I think we have to agree to disagree.

Nic




--
CBI, MD


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From:
(CBI)
Newsgroups: misc.kids.health
Subject: Have you tried an electric toothbrush?
Date: 3 May 2004 08:42:55 -0700
Organization:
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References:


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  #9  
Old May 4th 04, 03:41 PM
Jonathan Smith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

John Doe wrote in message ...
"CBI" wrote
"John Doe" wrote in message
(CBI) wrote


Consumers reports agrees that it makes no difference.

Care to provide a quotation/citation? An issue date?


It was discussed in the December 2003 issue. This is only
available on-line for a fee.
Now that I have shown you mine would you care to do the
same?


I wont subscribe to Consumer Reports to seek proof of your claim.
Perhaps what you recall isn't what was said. Or maybe they screwed up
royally.


You asked for the citation, it was given to you. I think that pretty
much takes care of it.

If you know how to use the Usenet archives, you have no need for
Consumer Reports.


Yep - there you go - a self selected bunch of anecdotes and you think
you have confirmatory data. Naive is the nicest word I can think to
describe your approach.

You had such a great opportunity and you booted it.

Had you cited Nourallah and Splieth in Caries Research. [2004
Mar-Apr;38(2):91-4] you would have had a story. Or you could have
cited Lazarescu et al in the Journal of Clinical Periodontol. [2003
Aug;30(8):726-31.]

Of course, CBI is far too astute and would promptly reply that Addy et
al showed no difference of effects in the International Dental Journal
[2003;53 Suppl 3:177-86.], to which you might have replied that it is
a review and not primary research. But CBI would have pulled out
Danser et al in J. Clin Periodontol [2003 Feb;30(2):138-44.] and shown
how little (if any) differences there are, even in the hands of
professionals.

No, instead you say this:

I don't mean everything users say is true, sometimes
even the consensus could be wrong. Sometimes you have to read between
the lines. In any case, the wealth of available information/opinions is
greater than any other single source in the world, and growing.

A quick search provides me some very enthusiastic and experienced
collaboration, and no experienced disagreement.


As for anecdotes - this has got to be the classic!

...ALL MY GRANDKIDS HAVE ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSHES. ALL MY GROWN KIDS HAVE
THEM ALSO. YES, I THINK THEY DO A MUCH BETTER JOB OF CLEANING THEIR
TEETH. ALL OF THEM! ...ALL THREE OF MINE HAS ONE. AND THEY LOVE THEM
[the thread started with an all capital letter post, apparently the
others playfully followed suit]


Though the personal appeal (I know it because I know it) is the one
upsmanship of anecdote!

Mine is not guessing. I have been testing it for years. I posted about
them here 3 1/2 years ago. I know the difference between electric and
manual brushing. I can see and feel the difference.
If they work better.....


They are simply wonderful for those of us who appreciate good dental
health.


What was it you said? Oh, yeh - "...sometimes even the consensus
could be wrong."

Thru my own experience, I know without a doubt there is a big positive
difference using an electric toothbrush (given device integrity and
normal use).


So, back to the personal appeal - goody for you. In the real world,
we use data.

The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they have more
fun with it and use it longer it may help.

I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a long time.
Like any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on
things. An electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that
abraisive action in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the
same amount of cleaning in much less time, long as you reach the same
areas. Since you hold the brush head still, applying it to one point
is very easy. So you not only have the pulsing action, you can
concentrate the action in the exact right area (like in the back of
your mouth). But again, not good to do so for a long time, IMO.


You just love to speculate, don't you?


Very much. Inventing things requires lots of speculation. Sometimes I
speculate until dizzy. But the above is mostly fact.


To which I reply - provide me YOUR citation!

I actually think that is a good thing so long as you can keep track of
the difference between what is your own idle speculations and
what is established fact (or at least one with a modicum of
factual support).


Since I am not an engineer, I have to build the things I invent and
design. I turn speculation into fact all the time.


Yes, that you do, I have no doubt. Unfortunately, you definition of
fact is not consistent with the scientific definition. Hence, you are
neither an engineer or a scientist. You are...a salesman!

Since I have 32 teeth and years experience using various electric
toothbrushes, there isn't anything speculative about my opinion here.

Again. Buying rechargeable batteries and a recharger is important, not
to test the thing but to make the thing worthwhile for practical use.

BTW. The new Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) rechargeables are much better
than the old. They last 40% longer, do not degrade when only partially
discharged, and do not hurt the environment like NiCads used to. Any
modern device should use NiMHs. And never charge other types of
batteries in a NiMH charger unless the directions plainly state
otherwise.


Actually, Lithium Ion is the best for performance and environmental
safety. Power to weight is the best, no memory effect, and the
components are 98% recoverable.

But you knew that.

js
  #10  
Old May 4th 04, 08:54 PM
John Doe
external usenet poster
 
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Default Have you tried an electric toothbrush?

"Nic" wrote
"John Doe" wrote in message


Me thinks some people are feeling a little guilty for not taking good
care of their kids dental health. And you should IMO, unless perhaps
you live in Siberia/China and your economy isn't good enough to
readily provide such things. Here in the United States, electric
toothbrushes cost little as $5 (five US dollars). The rechargeable
batteries cost extra but will save money and trips to the store in a
short while.


Here thou (where I live) electric toothbrushes aren't as cheap as $5.
The normal price range is from $50 (being the cheapest and they go
upwards to $130 something. So working out you need to spend at least
$50 to start of with, to start brushing, not including tooth heads,
That means buying normal toothbrushes at the cost little of $1 you
could buy 50 ( or more on specail) which would last at least 10 years
working out that you replace your toothbrush every 3 to 4 months as it
is good hygenine to do so.


Or you can use your finger, for free.

In fact, I did not buy an electic toothbrush until late 2000 when here
in the United States the cheaper models began to appear. Shortly after
that time, Braun/Oral-B felt the crunch and slashed the price on their
low end model. Competition from other companies has radically reduced
the price of electric toothbrushes here.

I would assume that electical toothbrush heads would need to be
replaced about the same legnth of time and at $ 30 dollars or more for
a pack of 4 makes it expensive option to use.


Here, the store shelves which contain toothbrushes are also full of
Crest, Colgate, budget Oral-B, and other electric toothbrushes. They
sell for about $5 USD. The replacement heads cost about $2.50 USD each.
They last for at least one month.

Without a doubt, there is a huge positive difference using an
electric toothbrush.


The one caveate, especially with kids, is that if they have more
fun with it and use it longer it may help.


I would caution against using an electric toothbrush for a long time.
Like any polisher/cleaner, manual or electric, a brush wears on
things. An electric toothbrush can and will accomplish more of that
abraisive action in a fraction of the time. You can accomplish the
same amount of cleaning in much less time, long as you reach the same
areas. Since you hold the brush head still, applying it to one point
is very easy. So you not only have the pulsing action, you can
concentrate the action in the exact right area (like in the back of
your mouth). But again, not good to do so for a long time, IMO.


hang on... your saying use caution ? why ? If it is that much better
as you claim, then why do you need to use caution ?


Unless you are simply trolling, apparently you do not understand the
big difference between manual and power tools. A power tool will do more
in much less time. Skillfully used, it does a much better job too.
Misused, it can hurt stuff.

As I already explained, you need to use caution because a brush wears on
things. Rubbing/scratching is how a brush attempts to remove the thick
filth which currently clings to your teeth.

Softer bristles probably are a good idea, especially at first.

Mine has very soft bristles, so I can use it for quite a while. Over
the years, it has even removed plaque. My teeth have never been
cleaner (I also floss regularly).
But seriously. If you haven't tried one, and you can buy one easily,
go for it. Your kids will be much better off for your
good/experienced advice.


I think we have to agree to disagree.


The difference is your innexperienced opinion and hearsay goes against
the multitude of experienced user comments on Usenet every reader can
see.

If you cannot afford one, that is too bad. But those who can afford one
should try an electric toothbrush. Right now, here in the United States,
electric toothbrushes are affordable especially considering the
benefit of using one.




Nic


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Subject: Have you tried an electric toothbrush?
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