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Organic milk / hormone free milk



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 14th 07, 07:47 PM posted to misc.kids
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 223
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk

On Dec 13, 9:40�am, (Beth Kevles) wrote:
regarding whole milk... It turns out that the fat is where the hormones
hang out. �I read an interesting article - I wish I could remember where
- that compared hormone levels in children who drink milk from
"traditional" cows (my terminology) with those who drink milk from
"modern" cows. �Traditional cows are defined to be those who are milked
only after producing a calf, and then stop being milked when their calf
weans, and then are milked again when they have another calf. �Modern
cows are those who have one calf and then are milked continuously
thereafter, and are the norm on modern American "factory" farms.

Anyway, the kids who drank whole milk from modern cows had much higher
hormone levels (I think they were measuring estrogen) than kids in other
groups. �The study was a preliminary one and was conducted on children
in, perhaps Tibet? �The researcher involved was very eager to return to
conduct further studies to get at what was really going on, since many
variables were NOT controlled for in the preliminary one.

If you want to look the article up, I'd guess I read it in either The
New Yorker or else the New York Times Sunday magazine. �It was
interesting.

--Beth Kevles
� -THE-COM-HERE
http://web.mit.edu/kevles/www/nomilk.html-- a page for the milk-allergic
� Disclaimer: �Nothing in this message should be construed as medical
� advice. �Please consult with your own medical practicioner.

NOTE: �No email is read at my MIT address. �Use the GMAIL one if you would
like me to reply.


I saw a TV show on that subject one day. They were offering some
children treatments to counterbalance the effects the excessive
hormone-intake they got from the foods they consumed. Disturbing
really IMO.
  #22  
Old December 14th 07, 11:51 PM posted to misc.kids
enigma
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 447
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk

Chris wrote in

oups.com:

If they are getting adequate fat intake elsewhere, the
minor difference in milk levels can be tweaked accordingly.
You need to find out how much fat is recommended in kids at
certain ages and then see how they are doing without
consumption of milk to gauge it. My 2-year- old is 40
pounds and is on 1% milk. His pediatrician evaluated his
individual situation, which is one varied in diet and a
nonpicky eater, and decided that the extra found in the
milk was not a necessity for him.


your 2 year old weighs 40 pounds? my 7 year old weighs 47
pounds. and he's hardly a picky eater. he just doesn't eat
much at a time.
lee
  #23  
Old December 15th 07, 12:43 AM posted to misc.kids
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 223
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk

On Dec 14, 5:51�pm, enigma wrote:
Chris wrote
oups.com:

If they are getting adequate fat intake elsewhere, the
minor difference in milk levels can be tweaked accordingly.
You need to find out how much fat is recommended in kids at
certain ages and then see how they are doing without
consumption of milk to gauge it. My 2-year- old is 40
pounds and is on 1% milk. His pediatrician evaluated his
individual situation, which is one varied in diet and a
nonpicky eater, and decided that the extra found in the
milk was not a necessity for him.


your 2 year old weighs 40 pounds? my 7 year old weighs 47
pounds. and he's hardly a picky eater. he just doesn't eat
much at a time.
lee


Yes. My 8-year-old weighs 50 pounds and my 10-year-old weighs 63
pounds and they are both tall and thin as rails. The 2-year-old isn't
obese by any means; he still has the baby look though. He is just big
all the way around. He is over 3-feet tall as well at 38" inches. The
last time we went on vacation, people would ask him how old he was and
he couldn't answer. Their guess was 3, but he was only 15 months old
at the time. My first two both weighed 22 pounds at a year and only 23
pounds at 2 years, so he is definitely big. I have a foot stool on
which I placed the footprints of the first two when they were 2 1/2
(my daughter) and 4 1/2 (my first son), and when this baby was 16
months old, we added his to the footstool -- his foot at 16 months was
only 1/4" smaller than my daughter's at 2 1/2 and just even slightly
smaller than that still of my first's at 4 1/2. He has big hands too.
  #24  
Old December 15th 07, 10:37 PM posted to misc.kids
Akuvikate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 143
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk

On Dec 14, 3:43*pm, Chris wrote:
On Dec 14, 5:51�pm, enigma wrote:





Chris wrote
oups.com:


If they are getting adequate fat intake elsewhere, the
minor difference in milk levels can be tweaked accordingly.
You need to find out how much fat is recommended in kids at
certain ages and then see how they are doing without
consumption of milk to gauge it. My 2-year- old is 40
pounds and is on 1% milk. His pediatrician evaluated his
individual situation, which is one varied in diet and a
nonpicky eater, and decided that the extra found in the
milk was not a necessity for him.


your 2 year old weighs 40 pounds? my 7 year old weighs 47
pounds. and he's hardly a picky eater. he just doesn't eat
much at a time.
lee


Yes. My 8-year-old weighs 50 pounds and my 10-year-old weighs 63
pounds and they are both tall and thin as rails. The 2-year-old isn't
obese by any means; he still has the baby look though. He is just big
all the way around. He is over 3-feet tall as well at 38" inches.


By the numbers you give he actually would qualify as obese. If you
look at the growth curves you can see how this is determined. His
weight is over the 95%ile no matter how old he is exactly. His height
could be anywhere from over the 95%ile to about the 65%ile depending
on exactly how many months he is. At 38 inches and 40lbs, his BMI,
which is a measure of weight for height, is 19.5. The healthy weight
range for children is to be between the 5th and 85th percentile.
"Overweight" (until recently called "at risk for overweight") is
considered to be between the 85-95%ile. Obesity is above the 95%ile
(until recently this was called "overweight"). The cutoff for obesity
is 19.4 for a boy who just turned two, and goes down to 18.2 for a boy
who's about to turn three. You can see the growth charts yourself at
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/...l/cj41l017.pdf
for weight and height, and
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/...l/cj41l023.pdf
for BMI.

You can choose to take this into consideration or ignore it as you
wish. Fortunately overweight in younger children is much more easily
addressed than in older children or adults. Pediatricians are
supposed to be plotting weight, height, and BMI at all well-child
checks starting at 2 years of age but many are not yet doing so.

Perhaps you've already aware of this, but what can be a big challenge
with 2-year-olds who are over 40lbs are carseats. Most carseats with
the built-in harness are only good to 40lbs. Most children that young
are not tall enough for booster seats. To be tall enough for a
booster seat the car seatbelt needs to go over his collarbone (not his
neck) and around his hips (not his belly). There are only a few
carseats that will accomodate kids of this age at this size, and for
the most part they're pretty pricey. Fisher Price and Britax make the
only ones I'm aware of.

Kate, ignorant foot soldier of the medical cartel
and the Bug, 4 years old
and something brewing, 4/08
  #25  
Old December 16th 07, 07:04 AM posted to misc.kids
Anne Rogers[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 670
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk


Perhaps you've already aware of this, but what can be a big challenge
with 2-year-olds who are over 40lbs are carseats. Most carseats with
the built-in harness are only good to 40lbs. Most children that young
are not tall enough for booster seats. To be tall enough for a
booster seat the car seatbelt needs to go over his collarbone (not his
neck) and around his hips (not his belly). There are only a few
carseats that will accomodate kids of this age at this size, and for
the most part they're pretty pricey. Fisher Price and Britax make the
only ones I'm aware of.


Check out the law in your state as well, here in WA, the law states the
child has to be both 40lb AND 4years old to use a booster. There are a
lot more car seats on the market now that accomodate extremes in both
directions. Britax has a few, though all the ones that we saw were very
bulky, we have a small car and needed something smaller, we ended up
something called "Safeguard Go Portable Booster", which needs your car
to have a rear anchor, it looks like a booster, but as a soft back that
once anchored provides a head rest and the shoulder attachments for the
harness, which have a wide range of height adjustment, it will take a
child up to 60lb with the harness and converts to a booster and has a
strap to locate the seatbelt correctly in that mode. The other smaller
seat that we found was called Radian65, it doesn't convert to a booster,
but has a lot of potential for height adjustment as it does newborn to
65lb in a 5 point harness, there is also Radian80, which was a bit more
expensive, but goes up to 80lb, I don't know what other changes it has
compared to the 65. They are both very heavy seats, but a very different
shape to other seats on the market, they also fold, the seat folds up to
the back and lies flat, we decided to buy a bag so it can be carried
like a rucksack, but there is a single shoulder strap on the seat, the
shape of it has also meant it's a lot easier for our 2.5 year old to
climb into, which has been fantastic for me as I was struggling to get
her into her old seat and she couldn't manage herself. Unfortunately
we've found it quite a difficult seat to install and adjust, but it's
been worth it compared to the alternatives.

Cheers
Anne
  #26  
Old December 17th 07, 07:59 AM posted to misc.kids
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 223
Default Organic milk / hormone free milk

On Dec 15, 4:37*pm, Akuvikate wrote:
On Dec 14, 3:43*pm, Chris wrote:





On Dec 14, 5:51�pm, enigma wrote:


Chris wrote
oups.com:


If they are getting adequate fat intake elsewhere, the
minor difference in milk levels can be tweaked accordingly.
You need to find out how much fat is recommended in kids at
certain ages and then see how they are doing without
consumption of milk to gauge it. My 2-year- old is 40
pounds and is on 1% milk. His pediatrician evaluated his
individual situation, which is one varied in diet and a
nonpicky eater, and decided that the extra found in the
milk was not a necessity for him.


your 2 year old weighs 40 pounds? my 7 year old weighs 47
pounds. and he's hardly a picky eater. he just doesn't eat
much at a time.
lee


Yes. My 8-year-old weighs 50 pounds and my 10-year-old weighs 63
pounds and they are both tall and thin as rails. The 2-year-old isn't
obese by any means; he still has the baby look though. He is just big
all the way around. He is over 3-feet tall as well at 38" inches.


By the numbers you give he actually would qualify as obese. *If you
look at the growth curves you can see how this is determined. His
weight is over the 95%ile no matter how old he is exactly. *His height
could be anywhere from over the 95%ile to about the 65%ile depending
on exactly how many months he is. *At 38 inches and 40lbs, his BMI,
which is a measure of weight for height, is 19.5. *The healthy weight
range for children is to be between the 5th and 85th percentile.
"Overweight" (until recently called "at risk for overweight") is
considered to be between the 85-95%ile. *Obesity is above the 95%ile
(until recently this was called "overweight"). *The cutoff for obesity
is 19.4 for a boy who just turned two, and goes down to 18.2 for a boy
who's about to turn three. *You can see the growth charts yourself athttp://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/growthcharts/set1clinical/cj41l01...
for weight and height, andhttp://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/growthcharts/set1clinical/cj41l02...
for BMI.

You can choose to take this into consideration or ignore it as you
wish. *Fortunately overweight in younger children is much more easily
addressed than in older children or adults. *Pediatricians are
supposed to be plotting weight, height, and BMI at all well-child
checks starting at 2 years of age but many are not yet doing so.

Perhaps you've already aware of this, but what can be a big challenge
with 2-year-olds who are over 40lbs are carseats. *Most carseats with
the built-in harness are only good to 40lbs. *Most children that young
are not tall enough for booster seats. *To be tall enough for a
booster seat the car seatbelt needs to go over his collarbone (not his
neck) and around his hips (not his belly). *There are only a few
carseats that will accomodate kids of this age at this size, and for
the most part they're pretty pricey. *Fisher Price and Britax make the
only ones I'm aware of.

Kate, ignorant foot soldier of the medical cartel
and the Bug, 4 years old
and something brewing, 4/08- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


You also need to take into consideration that some children are just
plain larger than the norm and that there is nothing to worry about
when their plotted charts reflect the consistency and all milestones
are met, etc. Had he deviated from *his* norm greatly from check to
check at any point, then there would be more cause for alarm. I don't
know about other areas, but plotting growth has been done at every
appointment since birth around these parts. What category is it called
when their height is also off the charts then? Many a baby/toddler has
been off the charts consistently in either category, and yet
considered normal, as in *their* norm, and some children will gain a
bit more weight just before gaining an inch or two in height as well.
It can all just be timing. They just recently started a new curve for
breastfed infants that finally takes them off the "need to worry" on
the low end as well. When my doctor tells me I have cause for alarm,
then I will rethink the level of alarm. lol. I have seen some of the
fattest exclusively breastfed infants as well, and in due time, they
even out. My first 2, at 23 pounds, were thin as rails, and I'm not
talking weight-wise, I'm talking in stature, from shoulder-to-shouler,
hip-to-hip, and it is obvious this boy *is* built entirely differently
- definite linebacker material.
 




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